Intact and Impaired Memory Functions in Autism

Loisa Bennetto, Bruce F. Pennington, Sally J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

378 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined memory functions in individuals with autism. Based on previous evidence of executive function (EF) deficits, we hypothesized that subjects with autism would demonstrate a pattern of intact and impaired memory functions similar to that found in other groups with EF deficits, such as patients with frontal lobe pathology. We compared the performance of high-functioning children and adolescents with autism (n = 19) and clinical comparison subjects (n = 19) matched on sex, CA, and VIQ on measures of memory and EF. The group with autism performed significantly worse than comparison subjects on measures of temporal order memory, source memory, supraspan free recall, working memory, and EF, but not on short- and long-term recognition, cued recall, or new learning ability, consistent with the predictions of the EF theory. The cognitive measures were significantly more intercorrelated in the autism group than the comparison group, consistent with a limit in central cognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1816-1835
Number of pages20
JournalChild Development
Volume67
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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    Bennetto, L., Pennington, B. F., & Rogers, S. J. (1996). Intact and Impaired Memory Functions in Autism. Child Development, 67(4), 1816-1835.