Initiation of Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Decompensated Respiratory Failure

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The role of the Hospitalist in the management of patients with acute respiratory failure is expanding. Acute respiratory failure is inherently unstable, and therefore requires frequent assessment, intervention, and reassessment. Hospitalists possess the knowledge and skills to manage heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and the other causes leading to respiratory failure and can meet the dynamic needs of these patients. Hospitalists should understand the indications and benefits of mechanical ventilation as well as the inherent and preventable risks from the time of endotracheal intubation to liberation from the ventilator.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-516
Number of pages14
JournalHospital Medicine Clinics
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hospitalists
Artificial Respiration
Respiratory Insufficiency
Intratracheal Intubation
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Mechanical Ventilators
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Asthma
Heart Failure

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • COPD
  • Endotracheal intubation
  • Heart failure
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Ventilator weaning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Initiation of Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Decompensated Respiratory Failure. / Signoff, Eric D.; Adams, Jason Yeates; Kuhn, Brooks.

In: Hospital Medicine Clinics, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.10.2017, p. 503-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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