Inhibitory deficits in Tourette syndrome: A function of comorbidity and symptom severity

Sally J Ozonoff, David L. Strayer, William M. McMahon, Francis Filloux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined central inhibitory function in children with Tourette syndrome (TS; N = 46) and normally developing controls (N = 22) matched on age, gender, and IQ. A negative priming task measured the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant distractor stimuli presented on a visual display. Initial analyses indicated that participants with Tourette syndrome did not differ significantly in inhibitory function from controls. However, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was separated into subgroups, one without evidence of comorbidity (N = 23) and the other meeting research criteria for either AD/HD, OCD, or both (N = 23), it became evident that individuals with Tourette syndrome with comorbid conditions tended to perform less well than the control group, whereas those without comorbidity performed much like controls. Similarly, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was divided into two subgroups on the basis of severity of symptomatology (N = 23 in each), those with more numerous and severe symptoms of Tourette syndrome, AD/HD, and OCD performed significantly less well than both controls and Tourette syndrome subjects with fewer and less severe symptoms. This suggests that neuropsychological impairment occurs as a function of comorbidity and symptom severity in Tourette syndrome. It also suggests that categorical diagnoses alone may be less useful than dimensional methods for predicting cognitive impairment in individuals with Tourette syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1118
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tourette Syndrome
Comorbidity
Aptitude
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Classification
  • Comorbidity
  • Information processing
  • Tourette syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Inhibitory deficits in Tourette syndrome : A function of comorbidity and symptom severity. / Ozonoff, Sally J; Strayer, David L.; McMahon, William M.; Filloux, Francis.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 39, No. 8, 1998, p. 1109-1118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{30a4d0ee8beb4532b0c8232566140e3b,
title = "Inhibitory deficits in Tourette syndrome: A function of comorbidity and symptom severity",
abstract = "This study examined central inhibitory function in children with Tourette syndrome (TS; N = 46) and normally developing controls (N = 22) matched on age, gender, and IQ. A negative priming task measured the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant distractor stimuli presented on a visual display. Initial analyses indicated that participants with Tourette syndrome did not differ significantly in inhibitory function from controls. However, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was separated into subgroups, one without evidence of comorbidity (N = 23) and the other meeting research criteria for either AD/HD, OCD, or both (N = 23), it became evident that individuals with Tourette syndrome with comorbid conditions tended to perform less well than the control group, whereas those without comorbidity performed much like controls. Similarly, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was divided into two subgroups on the basis of severity of symptomatology (N = 23 in each), those with more numerous and severe symptoms of Tourette syndrome, AD/HD, and OCD performed significantly less well than both controls and Tourette syndrome subjects with fewer and less severe symptoms. This suggests that neuropsychological impairment occurs as a function of comorbidity and symptom severity in Tourette syndrome. It also suggests that categorical diagnoses alone may be less useful than dimensional methods for predicting cognitive impairment in individuals with Tourette syndrome.",
keywords = "Classification, Comorbidity, Information processing, Tourette syndrome",
author = "Ozonoff, {Sally J} and Strayer, {David L.} and McMahon, {William M.} and Francis Filloux",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1017/S0021963098003230",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "1109--1118",
journal = "Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines",
issn = "0021-9630",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibitory deficits in Tourette syndrome

T2 - A function of comorbidity and symptom severity

AU - Ozonoff, Sally J

AU - Strayer, David L.

AU - McMahon, William M.

AU - Filloux, Francis

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - This study examined central inhibitory function in children with Tourette syndrome (TS; N = 46) and normally developing controls (N = 22) matched on age, gender, and IQ. A negative priming task measured the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant distractor stimuli presented on a visual display. Initial analyses indicated that participants with Tourette syndrome did not differ significantly in inhibitory function from controls. However, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was separated into subgroups, one without evidence of comorbidity (N = 23) and the other meeting research criteria for either AD/HD, OCD, or both (N = 23), it became evident that individuals with Tourette syndrome with comorbid conditions tended to perform less well than the control group, whereas those without comorbidity performed much like controls. Similarly, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was divided into two subgroups on the basis of severity of symptomatology (N = 23 in each), those with more numerous and severe symptoms of Tourette syndrome, AD/HD, and OCD performed significantly less well than both controls and Tourette syndrome subjects with fewer and less severe symptoms. This suggests that neuropsychological impairment occurs as a function of comorbidity and symptom severity in Tourette syndrome. It also suggests that categorical diagnoses alone may be less useful than dimensional methods for predicting cognitive impairment in individuals with Tourette syndrome.

AB - This study examined central inhibitory function in children with Tourette syndrome (TS; N = 46) and normally developing controls (N = 22) matched on age, gender, and IQ. A negative priming task measured the ability to inhibit processing of irrelevant distractor stimuli presented on a visual display. Initial analyses indicated that participants with Tourette syndrome did not differ significantly in inhibitory function from controls. However, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was separated into subgroups, one without evidence of comorbidity (N = 23) and the other meeting research criteria for either AD/HD, OCD, or both (N = 23), it became evident that individuals with Tourette syndrome with comorbid conditions tended to perform less well than the control group, whereas those without comorbidity performed much like controls. Similarly, when the large Tourette syndrome sample was divided into two subgroups on the basis of severity of symptomatology (N = 23 in each), those with more numerous and severe symptoms of Tourette syndrome, AD/HD, and OCD performed significantly less well than both controls and Tourette syndrome subjects with fewer and less severe symptoms. This suggests that neuropsychological impairment occurs as a function of comorbidity and symptom severity in Tourette syndrome. It also suggests that categorical diagnoses alone may be less useful than dimensional methods for predicting cognitive impairment in individuals with Tourette syndrome.

KW - Classification

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Information processing

KW - Tourette syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031754760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031754760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0021963098003230

DO - 10.1017/S0021963098003230

M3 - Article

C2 - 9844981

AN - SCOPUS:0031754760

VL - 39

SP - 1109

EP - 1118

JO - Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines

JF - Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines

SN - 0021-9630

IS - 8

ER -