Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) replication after transduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized CD34+ cells from HIV-1-infected donors using retroviral vectors containing anti-HIV-1 genes

Gerhard Bauer, Penelope Valdez, Karen Kearns, Ingrid Bahner, Sui Fang Wen, John A. Zaia, Donald B. Kohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transfer of 'anti-HIV-1 genes' into hematopoietic stem cells of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals may be a potent therapeutic approach to render mature cells arising from transduced stem cells resistant to the destructive events associated with HIV-1 infection. To determine the feasibility of gene therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in individuals already infected with HIV-1, granulocyte colony- stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells were isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals and transduced with retroviral vectors containing three different anti-HIV-1-genes: the Ray binding domain of the Rev Responsive Element (RRE decoy) (L-RRE-neo), a double hammerhead ribozyme vector targeted to cleave the tat and rev transcripts (L-TR/TAT-neo), and the trans-dominant mutant of rev (M10) (L-M10-SN). As a control, a vector mediating only neomycin resistance (LN) was used. After 3 days of transduction on allogeneic stroma in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-3, the cultures were G418-selected, and then challenged with HIV-1(JR-FL) and a primary HIV-1 isolate. Compared with the control cultures, the L-RRE-neo-, L-TR/TAT-neo-, and L-M10-SN-transduced cultures displayed up to 1,000-fold inhibition of HIV-1 replication after challenge with HIV-1(JR-FL) and the primary HIV-1 isolate. Growth of the hematopoietic cells in long-term bone marrow culture was not perturbed by the presence of any of the anti-HIV-1 genes. This study shows that anti-HIV-1 genes can be introduced into CD34+ cells from individuals already infected with HIV-1, and strongly inhibit HIV-1 replication in primary monocytes derived from the CD34+ progenitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2259-2267
Number of pages9
JournalBlood
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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