Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units

S. C. Handley, Robin H Steinhorn, A. O. Hopper, B. Govindaswami, D. R. Bhatt, K. P. Van Meurs, R. L. Ariagno, J. B. Gould, H. C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) use.Study Design:This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22 to 33+6/7 weeks of gestational age (GA), during 2005 to 2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation.Results:Of the 65 824 infants, 1718 (2.61%) received iNO. Infants, 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54%). Community NICUs (n=77, median hospital use rate 0.7%) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n=23, median hospital use rate 5.8%). In 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA infants, the median rate in regional centers was 10.6% (hospital interquartile range 3.8% to 22.6%).Conclusion:iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-639
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Fingerprint

Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Infants
Nitric Oxide
Gestational Age
Extremely Premature Infants
Population Characteristics
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Handley, S. C., Steinhorn, R. H., Hopper, A. O., Govindaswami, B., Bhatt, D. R., Van Meurs, K. P., ... Lee, H. C. (2016). Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units. Journal of Perinatology, 36(8), 635-639. https://doi.org/10.1038/jp.2016.49

Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units. / Handley, S. C.; Steinhorn, Robin H; Hopper, A. O.; Govindaswami, B.; Bhatt, D. R.; Van Meurs, K. P.; Ariagno, R. L.; Gould, J. B.; Lee, H. C.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 36, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 635-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Handley, SC, Steinhorn, RH, Hopper, AO, Govindaswami, B, Bhatt, DR, Van Meurs, KP, Ariagno, RL, Gould, JB & Lee, HC 2016, 'Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units', Journal of Perinatology, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 635-639. https://doi.org/10.1038/jp.2016.49
Handley SC, Steinhorn RH, Hopper AO, Govindaswami B, Bhatt DR, Van Meurs KP et al. Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units. Journal of Perinatology. 2016 Aug 1;36(8):635-639. https://doi.org/10.1038/jp.2016.49
Handley, S. C. ; Steinhorn, Robin H ; Hopper, A. O. ; Govindaswami, B. ; Bhatt, D. R. ; Van Meurs, K. P. ; Ariagno, R. L. ; Gould, J. B. ; Lee, H. C. / Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units. In: Journal of Perinatology. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 635-639.
@article{c880a03ad1504c808bcbd76b3a5768b4,
title = "Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units",
abstract = "Objective:To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) use.Study Design:This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22 to 33+6/7 weeks of gestational age (GA), during 2005 to 2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation.Results:Of the 65 824 infants, 1718 (2.61{\%}) received iNO. Infants, 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54{\%}). Community NICUs (n=77, median hospital use rate 0.7{\%}) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n=23, median hospital use rate 5.8{\%}). In 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA infants, the median rate in regional centers was 10.6{\%} (hospital interquartile range 3.8{\%} to 22.6{\%}).Conclusion:iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants.",
author = "Handley, {S. C.} and Steinhorn, {Robin H} and Hopper, {A. O.} and B. Govindaswami and Bhatt, {D. R.} and {Van Meurs}, {K. P.} and Ariagno, {R. L.} and Gould, {J. B.} and Lee, {H. C.}",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/jp.2016.49",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "635--639",
journal = "Journal of Perinatology",
issn = "0743-8346",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhaled nitric oxide use in preterm infants in California neonatal intensive care units

AU - Handley, S. C.

AU - Steinhorn, Robin H

AU - Hopper, A. O.

AU - Govindaswami, B.

AU - Bhatt, D. R.

AU - Van Meurs, K. P.

AU - Ariagno, R. L.

AU - Gould, J. B.

AU - Lee, H. C.

PY - 2016/8/1

Y1 - 2016/8/1

N2 - Objective:To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) use.Study Design:This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22 to 33+6/7 weeks of gestational age (GA), during 2005 to 2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation.Results:Of the 65 824 infants, 1718 (2.61%) received iNO. Infants, 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54%). Community NICUs (n=77, median hospital use rate 0.7%) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n=23, median hospital use rate 5.8%). In 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA infants, the median rate in regional centers was 10.6% (hospital interquartile range 3.8% to 22.6%).Conclusion:iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants.

AB - Objective:To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) use.Study Design:This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22 to 33+6/7 weeks of gestational age (GA), during 2005 to 2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation.Results:Of the 65 824 infants, 1718 (2.61%) received iNO. Infants, 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54%). Community NICUs (n=77, median hospital use rate 0.7%) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n=23, median hospital use rate 5.8%). In 22 to 24+6/7 weeks of GA infants, the median rate in regional centers was 10.6% (hospital interquartile range 3.8% to 22.6%).Conclusion:iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84962109507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84962109507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/jp.2016.49

DO - 10.1038/jp.2016.49

M3 - Article

C2 - 27031320

AN - SCOPUS:84962109507

VL - 36

SP - 635

EP - 639

JO - Journal of Perinatology

JF - Journal of Perinatology

SN - 0743-8346

IS - 8

ER -