Inhalation of high-concentration hydrogen gas attenuates cognitive deficits in a rat model of asphyxia induced-cardiac arrest

Lei Huang, Richard Applegate, Patricia Applegate, Lei Gong, Umut Ocak, Warren Boling, John Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cognitive deficits are a devastating neurological outcome seen in survivors of cardiac arrest. We previously reported water electrolysis derived 67% hydrogen gas inhalation has some beneficial effects on short-term outcomes in a rat model of global brain hypoxia-ischemia induced by asphyxia cardiac arrest. In the present study, we further investigated its protective effects in long-term spatial learning memory function using the same animal model. Water electrolysis derived 67% hydrogen gas was either administered 1 hour prior to cardiac arrest for 1 hour and at 1-hour post-resuscitation for 1 hour (pre- & post-treatment) or at 1-hour post-resuscitation for 2 hours (post-treatment). T-maze and Morris water maze were used for hippocampal memory function evaluation at 7 and 14 days post-resuscitation, respectively. Neuronal degeneration within hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) regions was examined by Fluoro-Jade staining ex vivo. Hippocampal deficits were detected at 7 and 18 days post-resuscitation, with increased neuronal degeneration within hippocampal CA1 regions. Both hydrogen gas treatment regimens significantly improved spatial learning function and attenuated neuronal degeneration within hippocampal CA1 regions at 18 days post-resuscitation. Our findings suggest that water electrolysis derived 67% hydrogen gas may be an effective therapeutic approach for improving cognitive outcomes associated with global brain hypoxia-ischemia following cardiac arrest. The study was approved by the Animal Health and Safety Committees of Loma Linda University, USA (approval number: IACUC #8170006) on March 2, 2017.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Gas Research
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Induced Heart Arrest
Asphyxia
Resuscitation
Inhalation
Hydrogen
Electrolysis
Gases
Heart Arrest
Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia
Hippocampus
Water
Loma
Animal Care Committees
Long-Term Memory
Therapeutics
Survivors
Animal Models
Staining and Labeling
Safety
Health

Keywords

  • brain resuscitation
  • cardiac arrest
  • cognitive deficit
  • global brain ischemia
  • high concentration hydrogen gas
  • neuron
  • rat
  • water maze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Inhalation of high-concentration hydrogen gas attenuates cognitive deficits in a rat model of asphyxia induced-cardiac arrest. / Huang, Lei; Applegate, Richard; Applegate, Patricia; Gong, Lei; Ocak, Umut; Boling, Warren; Zhang, John.

In: Medical Gas Research, Vol. 9, No. 3, 09.2019, p. 122-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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