Influenza-induced innate immunity: Regulators of viral replication, respiratory tract pathology & adaptive immunity

Karen L. Oslund, Nicole Baumgarth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenza virus infections usually cause mild to moderately severe respiratory disease, however some infections, like those involving the avian H5N1 virus, can cause massive viral pneumonia, systemic disease and death. The innate immune response of respiratory tract resident cells is the first line of defense and limits virus replication. Enhanced cytokine and chemokine production following infection, however, appears to underlie much of the pathology that develops after infection with highly pathogenic strains. A so-called 'cytokine storm can damage the lung tissue and cause systemic disease, despite the control of viral replication. By summarizing current knowledge of the innate responses mounted to influenza infection, this review highlights the importance of the respiratory tract epithelial cells as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity to influenza virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-962
Number of pages12
JournalFuture Virology
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Respiratory System
Human Influenza
Pathology
Infection
Orthomyxoviridae
Viral Pneumonia
Cytokines
H5N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Virus Diseases
Virus Replication
Chemokines
Epithelial Cells
Lung

Keywords

  • antiviral immunity
  • cytokine
  • cytokine storm
  • influenza A
  • innate immunity
  • lung epithelium
  • respiratory tract
  • type I IFN
  • virulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Influenza-induced innate immunity : Regulators of viral replication, respiratory tract pathology & adaptive immunity. / Oslund, Karen L.; Baumgarth, Nicole.

In: Future Virology, Vol. 6, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 951-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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