Influence of vegetation on carbon dioxide trap effectiveness for sampling mosquitoes in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Kern County, California.

R. P. Meyer, William Reisen, M. M. Milby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of vegetation on sampling Culex tarsalis, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Aedes nigromaculis by CO2 traps was evaluated at an intermittent stream habitat at the base of the Sierra Nevada foothills. Carbon dioxide traps were spaced along a 450 m transect perpendicular to Poso Creek to determine female attraction to traps placed in 5 different vegetation substrates: 1) open hilltop with sparse growth of grasses and saltbush, 2) open pasture with sparse growth of saltbush, 3) peripheral understory of mule fat, 4) shaded understory of mule fat, and 5) open canopy 5 m above ground in willow and cottonwood trees. Most host-seeking Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus females were collected within the open canopy and peripheral understory. Host-seeking Ae. nigromaculis females were collected predominately in the open pasture and within the peripheral understory. The association between CO2 trap catch size and vegetation suggested a relationship between the host-feeding patterns and associated hunting strategies of these bird and mammal feeding species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-475
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume7
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atriplex
Culicidae
mosquito
Carbon Dioxide
Aedes nigromaculis
understory
Equidae
traps
carbon dioxide
mules
host seeking
vegetation
sampling
Fats
Salix
fat
Populus
pasture
Culex
Aedes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

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abstract = "The effect of vegetation on sampling Culex tarsalis, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Aedes nigromaculis by CO2 traps was evaluated at an intermittent stream habitat at the base of the Sierra Nevada foothills. Carbon dioxide traps were spaced along a 450 m transect perpendicular to Poso Creek to determine female attraction to traps placed in 5 different vegetation substrates: 1) open hilltop with sparse growth of grasses and saltbush, 2) open pasture with sparse growth of saltbush, 3) peripheral understory of mule fat, 4) shaded understory of mule fat, and 5) open canopy 5 m above ground in willow and cottonwood trees. Most host-seeking Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus females were collected within the open canopy and peripheral understory. Host-seeking Ae. nigromaculis females were collected predominately in the open pasture and within the peripheral understory. The association between CO2 trap catch size and vegetation suggested a relationship between the host-feeding patterns and associated hunting strategies of these bird and mammal feeding species.",
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