Influence of maternal dietary zinc intake on in vitro tubulin polymerization in fetal rat brain

P. I. Oteiza, S. Cuellar, B. Lonnerdal, L. S. Hurley, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that one of the biochemical lesions underlying zinc deficiency-induced teratogenicity is altered microtubule formation was tested. Day 19 fetuses from zinc-deficient Sprague-Dawley dams were characterized by low brain supernate zinc concentrations and slow brain tubulin polymerization rates compared to controls. Brain supernate tubulin and protein concentrations were similar in zinc-deficient and control fetuses. In vitro brain tubulin polymerization rates were increased following addition of zinc to either control or zinc-deficient brain supernates; however, the stimulatory effect of added zinc on polymerization was significantly higher in brain supernates obtained from zinc-deficient fetuses compared to controls. These results support the idea that one effect of fetal zinc deficiency is a reduction in tubulin polymerization, which in turn may result in altered microtubule function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalTeratology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

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Tubulin
Polymerization
Zinc
Rats
Brain
Mothers
Fetus
Microtubules
In Vitro Techniques
Dams

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Embryology
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Oteiza, P. I., Cuellar, S., Lonnerdal, B., Hurley, L. S., & Keen, C. L. (1990). Influence of maternal dietary zinc intake on in vitro tubulin polymerization in fetal rat brain. Teratology, 41(1), 97-104. https://doi.org/10.1002/tera.1420410110

Influence of maternal dietary zinc intake on in vitro tubulin polymerization in fetal rat brain. / Oteiza, P. I.; Cuellar, S.; Lonnerdal, B.; Hurley, L. S.; Keen, Carl L.

In: Teratology, Vol. 41, No. 1, 1990, p. 97-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oteiza, PI, Cuellar, S, Lonnerdal, B, Hurley, LS & Keen, CL 1990, 'Influence of maternal dietary zinc intake on in vitro tubulin polymerization in fetal rat brain', Teratology, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 97-104. https://doi.org/10.1002/tera.1420410110
Oteiza, P. I. ; Cuellar, S. ; Lonnerdal, B. ; Hurley, L. S. ; Keen, Carl L. / Influence of maternal dietary zinc intake on in vitro tubulin polymerization in fetal rat brain. In: Teratology. 1990 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 97-104.
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