Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. A correlated biochemical and histological study

C. K. Chow, Charles Plopper, D. L. Dungworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppm ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statistically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all animals exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lung tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-317
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

Fingerprint

Ozone
vitamin
Vitamin E
Rats
ozone
Lung
lesion
Malate Dehydrogenase
Pyruvate Kinase
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase
Glutathione
glucose
Animals
phosphate
Ozone Depletion
Glutathione Reductase
animal
Nutrition
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Peroxidase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. A correlated biochemical and histological study. / Chow, C. K.; Plopper, Charles; Dungworth, D. L.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.1979, p. 309-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a8cd2e98f80b46d083c0c6e6e12654e2,
title = "Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. A correlated biochemical and histological study",
abstract = "The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppm ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statistically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all animals exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lung tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.",
author = "Chow, {C. K.} and Charles Plopper and Dungworth, {D. L.}",
year = "1979",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "309--317",
journal = "Environmental Research",
issn = "0013-9351",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of dietary vitamin E on the lungs of ozone-exposed rats. A correlated biochemical and histological study

AU - Chow, C. K.

AU - Plopper, Charles

AU - Dungworth, D. L.

PY - 1979/1/1

Y1 - 1979/1/1

N2 - The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppm ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statistically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all animals exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lung tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.

AB - The effect of dietary vitamin E on pulmonary susceptibility to near ambient levels of ozone was studied in rats. Exposure to 0.7 or 0.8 ppm ozone continuously for 7 days resulted in significant biochemical augmentations in the lungs of both vitamin E-deficient and -supplemented rats. The relative order of the change was glutathione (GSH) peroxidase > lactate dehydrogenase > glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase > reduced glutathione > malic enzyme > glutathione reductase > protein and malic dehydrogenase. Except for malic dehydrogenase, the degrees of biochemical changes were greater in the lungs of vitamin E-deficient rats than those of the supplemented group following ozone exposure, and the differences in the levels of GSH peroxidase, G-6-P dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and GSH were statistically significant. Histological examination of animal lungs revealed that all animals exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone for 7 days had detectable lesions compared to none from the control groups. However, almost all the lungs categorized as having severe lesions by two investigators in a blind study were from rats fed the vitamin E-deficient diet, while nearly all the lungs from the supplemented group had mild lesions. The results suggest that dietary vitamin E alters cellular sensitivity of lung tissue to ozone exposure, and that depletion of dietary vitamin E lowers the threshold concentration of ozone at which effects can be detected.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018572022&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018572022&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9

DO - 10.1016/0013-9351(79)90006-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 546640

AN - SCOPUS:0018572022

VL - 20

SP - 309

EP - 317

JO - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

IS - 2

ER -