Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability

Thomas J. Noone, Darryl L. Millis, Donna L. Korvick, Kyriacos Athanasiou, James L. Cook, Keiichi Kuroki, Fran Buonomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To determine biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in a semi-stable stifle model and in clinical patients and to determine the effect of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone (STH) on those properties. Animals-22 healthy adult dogs and 12 dogs with meniscal damage secondary to cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Procedure-The CCL was transected in 15 dogs, and stifles were immediately stabilized. Implants releasing 4 mg of STH/d were placed in 7 dogs, and 8 received sham implants. Seven dogs were used as untreated controls. Force plate analysis was performed before surgery and 2, 5, and 10 weeks after surgery. After 10 weeks, dogs were euthanatized, and menisci from surgical and contralateral stifles were harvested. The torn caudal,horn of the medial meniscus in dogs with CCL rupture comprised the clinical group. Creep indentation determined aggregate modulus (HA), Poisson's ratio (v), permeability (k), and percentage recovery (%R). Water content (%W), collagen content (C), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, and collagen type-I (cl) and -II (cll) immunoreactivity were also determined. Results-Surgical and clinical groups had lower HA, k, %R, C, sGAG, cl, and cll and higher %W than the nonsurgical group. Surgical stifles with greater weight bearing had stiffer menisci than those bearing less weight. Collagen content was higher in the surgical group receiving STH than the surgical group without STH. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Acute stabilization and moderate weight bearing of the CCL-deficient stifle appear to protect stiffness of the medial meniscus. Normal appearing menisci from CCL-deficient stifles can have alterations in biomechanical and biochemical properties, which may contribute to meniscal failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-426
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume63
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stifle
Tibial Meniscus
somatotropin
Growth Hormone
Canidae
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
cranial cruciate ligament
hormones
Hormones
Dogs
A73025
dogs
Weight-Bearing
collagen
glycosaminoglycans
Rupture
Collagen
surgery
Horns
Collagen Type I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Noone, T. J., Millis, D. L., Korvick, D. L., Athanasiou, K., Cook, J. L., Kuroki, K., & Buonomo, F. (2002). Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 63(3), 419-426.

Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability. / Noone, Thomas J.; Millis, Darryl L.; Korvick, Donna L.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos; Cook, James L.; Kuroki, Keiichi; Buonomo, Fran.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 63, No. 3, 01.03.2002, p. 419-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noone, Thomas J. ; Millis, Darryl L. ; Korvick, Donna L. ; Athanasiou, Kyriacos ; Cook, James L. ; Kuroki, Keiichi ; Buonomo, Fran. / Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2002 ; Vol. 63, No. 3. pp. 419-426.
@article{3aa7b76a23ec4e17a1847544821c5e92,
title = "Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability",
abstract = "Objective-To determine biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in a semi-stable stifle model and in clinical patients and to determine the effect of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone (STH) on those properties. Animals-22 healthy adult dogs and 12 dogs with meniscal damage secondary to cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Procedure-The CCL was transected in 15 dogs, and stifles were immediately stabilized. Implants releasing 4 mg of STH/d were placed in 7 dogs, and 8 received sham implants. Seven dogs were used as untreated controls. Force plate analysis was performed before surgery and 2, 5, and 10 weeks after surgery. After 10 weeks, dogs were euthanatized, and menisci from surgical and contralateral stifles were harvested. The torn caudal,horn of the medial meniscus in dogs with CCL rupture comprised the clinical group. Creep indentation determined aggregate modulus (HA), Poisson's ratio (v), permeability (k), and percentage recovery ({\%}R). Water content ({\%}W), collagen content (C), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, and collagen type-I (cl) and -II (cll) immunoreactivity were also determined. Results-Surgical and clinical groups had lower HA, k, {\%}R, C, sGAG, cl, and cll and higher {\%}W than the nonsurgical group. Surgical stifles with greater weight bearing had stiffer menisci than those bearing less weight. Collagen content was higher in the surgical group receiving STH than the surgical group without STH. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Acute stabilization and moderate weight bearing of the CCL-deficient stifle appear to protect stiffness of the medial meniscus. Normal appearing menisci from CCL-deficient stifles can have alterations in biomechanical and biochemical properties, which may contribute to meniscal failure.",
author = "Noone, {Thomas J.} and Millis, {Darryl L.} and Korvick, {Donna L.} and Kyriacos Athanasiou and Cook, {James L.} and Keiichi Kuroki and Fran Buonomo",
year = "2002",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "419--426",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone on biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in stifles with altered stability

AU - Noone, Thomas J.

AU - Millis, Darryl L.

AU - Korvick, Donna L.

AU - Athanasiou, Kyriacos

AU - Cook, James L.

AU - Kuroki, Keiichi

AU - Buonomo, Fran

PY - 2002/3/1

Y1 - 2002/3/1

N2 - Objective-To determine biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in a semi-stable stifle model and in clinical patients and to determine the effect of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone (STH) on those properties. Animals-22 healthy adult dogs and 12 dogs with meniscal damage secondary to cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Procedure-The CCL was transected in 15 dogs, and stifles were immediately stabilized. Implants releasing 4 mg of STH/d were placed in 7 dogs, and 8 received sham implants. Seven dogs were used as untreated controls. Force plate analysis was performed before surgery and 2, 5, and 10 weeks after surgery. After 10 weeks, dogs were euthanatized, and menisci from surgical and contralateral stifles were harvested. The torn caudal,horn of the medial meniscus in dogs with CCL rupture comprised the clinical group. Creep indentation determined aggregate modulus (HA), Poisson's ratio (v), permeability (k), and percentage recovery (%R). Water content (%W), collagen content (C), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, and collagen type-I (cl) and -II (cll) immunoreactivity were also determined. Results-Surgical and clinical groups had lower HA, k, %R, C, sGAG, cl, and cll and higher %W than the nonsurgical group. Surgical stifles with greater weight bearing had stiffer menisci than those bearing less weight. Collagen content was higher in the surgical group receiving STH than the surgical group without STH. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Acute stabilization and moderate weight bearing of the CCL-deficient stifle appear to protect stiffness of the medial meniscus. Normal appearing menisci from CCL-deficient stifles can have alterations in biomechanical and biochemical properties, which may contribute to meniscal failure.

AB - Objective-To determine biomechanical and biochemical properties of the medial meniscus in a semi-stable stifle model and in clinical patients and to determine the effect of canine recombinant somatotropin hormone (STH) on those properties. Animals-22 healthy adult dogs and 12 dogs with meniscal damage secondary to cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Procedure-The CCL was transected in 15 dogs, and stifles were immediately stabilized. Implants releasing 4 mg of STH/d were placed in 7 dogs, and 8 received sham implants. Seven dogs were used as untreated controls. Force plate analysis was performed before surgery and 2, 5, and 10 weeks after surgery. After 10 weeks, dogs were euthanatized, and menisci from surgical and contralateral stifles were harvested. The torn caudal,horn of the medial meniscus in dogs with CCL rupture comprised the clinical group. Creep indentation determined aggregate modulus (HA), Poisson's ratio (v), permeability (k), and percentage recovery (%R). Water content (%W), collagen content (C), sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, and collagen type-I (cl) and -II (cll) immunoreactivity were also determined. Results-Surgical and clinical groups had lower HA, k, %R, C, sGAG, cl, and cll and higher %W than the nonsurgical group. Surgical stifles with greater weight bearing had stiffer menisci than those bearing less weight. Collagen content was higher in the surgical group receiving STH than the surgical group without STH. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Acute stabilization and moderate weight bearing of the CCL-deficient stifle appear to protect stiffness of the medial meniscus. Normal appearing menisci from CCL-deficient stifles can have alterations in biomechanical and biochemical properties, which may contribute to meniscal failure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036521188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036521188&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 419

EP - 426

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 3

ER -