Inflammation in ESRD: causes and potential consequences.

George Kaysen, Victoria Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malnutrition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by hypoalbuminemia, decreased serum creatinine and prealbumin, and decreased subjective global assessment (SGA) scores. Markers of malnutrition predict mortality and correlate closely with inflammatory markers, including serum cytokines and acute phase proteins. After multiple regression analysis, markers of inflammation become stronger predictors of mortality than nutritional markers, suggesting that malnutrition is a result of inflammation. The etiology of inflammation is variable and includes vascular access infection, bioincompatible dialyzers, back filtration of nonsterile dialysate, periodontal disease, urinary tract infections, and other pyogenic infections. Renal failure also may serve to promote inflammation through protein carbonylation. Differences in care patterns of ESRD patients and genetics may contribute to inflammation as evidenced by lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Asian populations. Inflammation results in loss of muscle mass and hypoalbuminemia as a consequence of its decreased synthesis and increased catabolism. Vascular disease occurs partly because of changes in lipoprotein structure and function, including oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and modification of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by serum amyloid A (SAA) and loss of apolipoprotein A-I. Leukocyte adhesion is promoted by changes in endothelial structure and function, whereas plasma proteins associated with cardiovascular disease (fibrinogen, lipoprotein[a]; SAA) are increased. Consequences of inflammation in ESRD patients include muscle wasting, erythropoetin resistance, and vascular disease. Whereas improvements in nutrition can increase serum albumin and creatinine levels, identification and removal of the underlying cause of inflammation should be one treatment goal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-160
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2003

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kidney diseases
Chronic Kidney Failure
inflammation
Inflammation
blood serum
Malnutrition
malnutrition
Serum Amyloid A Protein
Hypoalbuminemia
vascular diseases
amyloid
Vascular Diseases
lipoproteins
creatinine
Lipoproteins
Creatinine
Protein Carbonylation
urinary tract diseases
apolipoprotein A-I
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Urology
  • Food Science
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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abstract = "Malnutrition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by hypoalbuminemia, decreased serum creatinine and prealbumin, and decreased subjective global assessment (SGA) scores. Markers of malnutrition predict mortality and correlate closely with inflammatory markers, including serum cytokines and acute phase proteins. After multiple regression analysis, markers of inflammation become stronger predictors of mortality than nutritional markers, suggesting that malnutrition is a result of inflammation. The etiology of inflammation is variable and includes vascular access infection, bioincompatible dialyzers, back filtration of nonsterile dialysate, periodontal disease, urinary tract infections, and other pyogenic infections. Renal failure also may serve to promote inflammation through protein carbonylation. Differences in care patterns of ESRD patients and genetics may contribute to inflammation as evidenced by lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Asian populations. Inflammation results in loss of muscle mass and hypoalbuminemia as a consequence of its decreased synthesis and increased catabolism. Vascular disease occurs partly because of changes in lipoprotein structure and function, including oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and modification of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by serum amyloid A (SAA) and loss of apolipoprotein A-I. Leukocyte adhesion is promoted by changes in endothelial structure and function, whereas plasma proteins associated with cardiovascular disease (fibrinogen, lipoprotein[a]; SAA) are increased. Consequences of inflammation in ESRD patients include muscle wasting, erythropoetin resistance, and vascular disease. Whereas improvements in nutrition can increase serum albumin and creatinine levels, identification and removal of the underlying cause of inflammation should be one treatment goal.",
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