Infertility and abortion among first-lactation dairy cows seropositive or seronegative for Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo

Javier Guitian, Mark Thurmond, Sharon K. Hietala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To estimate the extent to which exposure to Leptospira hardjo before or at the time of first parturition was associated with infertility and abortion during the first lactation among dairy cows that had not been vaccinated for ≥ 12 months. Animals - 207 first-lactation cows from a herd of 2,000 lactating cows. Procedure - Cows were tested for antibodies to L hardjo within 40 days after calving. Time from calving to first breeding, time from calving to conception, number of breedings per conception, and risk of abortion were compared between cows seropositive for L hardjo and cows that were seronegative. Results - For the 9 (4.3%) cows that were seropositive for L hardjo, median time from calving to conception (132.6 days) was significantly longer than time for seronegative cows (95.4 days). Cows that were seropositive were twice as likely (relative risk, 2.07) to fail to conceive as seronegative cows. Mean number of breedings required per conception for seropositive cows (3.4) was significantly higher than that for seronegative cows (2.1). The proportion of seropositive cows that aborted was not significantly different from the proportion of seronegative cows that aborted. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Exposure of nonvaccinated dairy cows to L hardjo can be associated with a subsequent reduction in fertility, as indicated by a greater time from calving to conception and higher number of breedings required per conception. The efficacy of leptospiral vaccines should be assessed to determine whether vaccination will minimize herd infertility associated with L hardjo infection. (J Am Vet MedAssoc 1999;215:515-518).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-518
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume215
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1999

Fingerprint

Leptospira interrogans
Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo
abortion (animals)
Lactation
Infertility
dairy cows
lactation
cows
Breeding
calving
Leptospira
Fertility
Serogroup
Vaccination
Vaccines
breeding
Parturition
herds
Antibodies
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Infertility and abortion among first-lactation dairy cows seropositive or seronegative for Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. / Guitian, Javier; Thurmond, Mark; Hietala, Sharon K.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 215, No. 4, 15.08.1999, p. 515-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e651c55e9ba94aca87eb6b9a6cfe6d0a,
title = "Infertility and abortion among first-lactation dairy cows seropositive or seronegative for Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo",
abstract = "Objective - To estimate the extent to which exposure to Leptospira hardjo before or at the time of first parturition was associated with infertility and abortion during the first lactation among dairy cows that had not been vaccinated for ≥ 12 months. Animals - 207 first-lactation cows from a herd of 2,000 lactating cows. Procedure - Cows were tested for antibodies to L hardjo within 40 days after calving. Time from calving to first breeding, time from calving to conception, number of breedings per conception, and risk of abortion were compared between cows seropositive for L hardjo and cows that were seronegative. Results - For the 9 (4.3{\%}) cows that were seropositive for L hardjo, median time from calving to conception (132.6 days) was significantly longer than time for seronegative cows (95.4 days). Cows that were seropositive were twice as likely (relative risk, 2.07) to fail to conceive as seronegative cows. Mean number of breedings required per conception for seropositive cows (3.4) was significantly higher than that for seronegative cows (2.1). The proportion of seropositive cows that aborted was not significantly different from the proportion of seronegative cows that aborted. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Exposure of nonvaccinated dairy cows to L hardjo can be associated with a subsequent reduction in fertility, as indicated by a greater time from calving to conception and higher number of breedings required per conception. The efficacy of leptospiral vaccines should be assessed to determine whether vaccination will minimize herd infertility associated with L hardjo infection. (J Am Vet MedAssoc 1999;215:515-518).",
author = "Javier Guitian and Mark Thurmond and Hietala, {Sharon K.}",
year = "1999",
month = "8",
day = "15",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "215",
pages = "515--518",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infertility and abortion among first-lactation dairy cows seropositive or seronegative for Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo

AU - Guitian, Javier

AU - Thurmond, Mark

AU - Hietala, Sharon K.

PY - 1999/8/15

Y1 - 1999/8/15

N2 - Objective - To estimate the extent to which exposure to Leptospira hardjo before or at the time of first parturition was associated with infertility and abortion during the first lactation among dairy cows that had not been vaccinated for ≥ 12 months. Animals - 207 first-lactation cows from a herd of 2,000 lactating cows. Procedure - Cows were tested for antibodies to L hardjo within 40 days after calving. Time from calving to first breeding, time from calving to conception, number of breedings per conception, and risk of abortion were compared between cows seropositive for L hardjo and cows that were seronegative. Results - For the 9 (4.3%) cows that were seropositive for L hardjo, median time from calving to conception (132.6 days) was significantly longer than time for seronegative cows (95.4 days). Cows that were seropositive were twice as likely (relative risk, 2.07) to fail to conceive as seronegative cows. Mean number of breedings required per conception for seropositive cows (3.4) was significantly higher than that for seronegative cows (2.1). The proportion of seropositive cows that aborted was not significantly different from the proportion of seronegative cows that aborted. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Exposure of nonvaccinated dairy cows to L hardjo can be associated with a subsequent reduction in fertility, as indicated by a greater time from calving to conception and higher number of breedings required per conception. The efficacy of leptospiral vaccines should be assessed to determine whether vaccination will minimize herd infertility associated with L hardjo infection. (J Am Vet MedAssoc 1999;215:515-518).

AB - Objective - To estimate the extent to which exposure to Leptospira hardjo before or at the time of first parturition was associated with infertility and abortion during the first lactation among dairy cows that had not been vaccinated for ≥ 12 months. Animals - 207 first-lactation cows from a herd of 2,000 lactating cows. Procedure - Cows were tested for antibodies to L hardjo within 40 days after calving. Time from calving to first breeding, time from calving to conception, number of breedings per conception, and risk of abortion were compared between cows seropositive for L hardjo and cows that were seronegative. Results - For the 9 (4.3%) cows that were seropositive for L hardjo, median time from calving to conception (132.6 days) was significantly longer than time for seronegative cows (95.4 days). Cows that were seropositive were twice as likely (relative risk, 2.07) to fail to conceive as seronegative cows. Mean number of breedings required per conception for seropositive cows (3.4) was significantly higher than that for seronegative cows (2.1). The proportion of seropositive cows that aborted was not significantly different from the proportion of seronegative cows that aborted. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Exposure of nonvaccinated dairy cows to L hardjo can be associated with a subsequent reduction in fertility, as indicated by a greater time from calving to conception and higher number of breedings required per conception. The efficacy of leptospiral vaccines should be assessed to determine whether vaccination will minimize herd infertility associated with L hardjo infection. (J Am Vet MedAssoc 1999;215:515-518).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033566450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033566450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 215

SP - 515

EP - 518

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 4

ER -