Infection of the subcutis and skin of cats with rapidly growing mycobacteria: A review of microbiological and clinical findings

R. Malik, D. I. Wigney, D. Dawson, P. Martin, Geraldine B Hunt, D. N. Love

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mycobacteria were isolated and characterised from 49 cats with extensive infections of the subcutis and skin. Cats were generally between 3 and 10 years of age, and female cats were markedly over-represented. All isolates were rapid-growers and identified as either Mycobacteria smegmatis (40 strains) or M fortuitum (nine strains). On the basis of Etest for minimum inhibitory concentration and/or disc diffusion susceptibility testing, all strains of M smegmatis were susceptible to trimethoprim while all strains of M fortuitum were resistant. M smegmatis strains were typically susceptible to doxycycline, gentamicin and fluoroquinolones but not clarithromycin. All M fortuitum strains were susceptible to fluoroquinolones, and often also susceptible to gentamicin, doxycycline and clarithromycin. Generally, M smegmatis strains were more susceptible to antimicrobial agents than M fortuitum strains. Treatment of mycobacterial panniculitis involves long courses of antimicrobial agents, typically of 3-6 months, chosen on the basis of in vitro susceptibility testing and often combined with extensive surgical debridement and wound reconstruction. These therapies will result in effective cure of the disease. One or a combination of doxycycline, ciprofloxacin/enrofloxacin or clarithromycin are the drugs of choice for long-term oral therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-48
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smegma
Clarithromycin
Doxycycline
Mycobacterium
skin (animal)
Cats
Fluoroquinolones
cats
Anti-Infective Agents
Gentamicins
Skin
clarithromycin
Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests
Infection
infection
Panniculitis
doxycycline
Mycobacterium smegmatis
Trimethoprim
Microbial Sensitivity Tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Infection of the subcutis and skin of cats with rapidly growing mycobacteria : A review of microbiological and clinical findings. / Malik, R.; Wigney, D. I.; Dawson, D.; Martin, P.; Hunt, Geraldine B; Love, D. N.

In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 2, No. 1, 03.2000, p. 35-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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