Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children

Amy Vaughan Van Hecke, Peter Clive Mundy, C. Françoise Acra, Jessica J. Block, Christine E F Delgado, Meaghan V. Parlade, Jessica A. Meyer, A. Rebecca Neal, Yuly B. Pomares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infant joint attention has been observed to be related to social-emotional outcomes in at-risk children. To address whether this relation is also evident in typically developing children, 52 children were tested at 12, 15, 24, and 30 months to examine associations between infant joint attention and social outcomes. Twelve-month initiating and responding to joint attention were related to 30-month social competence and externalizing behavior, even when accounting for 15-month temperament ratings, 24-month cognition and language, and demographic variables. These results suggest that, in addition to associations with language and cognition, infant joint attention reflects robust aspects of development that are related to individual differences in the emergence of social and behavioral competence in childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-69
Number of pages17
JournalChild Development
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Temperament
social competence
Preschool Children
preschool child
infant
cognition
Cognition
Language
language
rating
childhood
Individuality
Demography
Social Skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Vaughan Van Hecke, A., Mundy, P. C., Acra, C. F., Block, J. J., Delgado, C. E. F., Parlade, M. V., ... Pomares, Y. B. (2007). Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children. Child Development, 78(1), 53-69. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x

Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children. / Vaughan Van Hecke, Amy; Mundy, Peter Clive; Acra, C. Françoise; Block, Jessica J.; Delgado, Christine E F; Parlade, Meaghan V.; Meyer, Jessica A.; Neal, A. Rebecca; Pomares, Yuly B.

In: Child Development, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 53-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vaughan Van Hecke, A, Mundy, PC, Acra, CF, Block, JJ, Delgado, CEF, Parlade, MV, Meyer, JA, Neal, AR & Pomares, YB 2007, 'Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children', Child Development, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 53-69. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x
Vaughan Van Hecke, Amy ; Mundy, Peter Clive ; Acra, C. Françoise ; Block, Jessica J. ; Delgado, Christine E F ; Parlade, Meaghan V. ; Meyer, Jessica A. ; Neal, A. Rebecca ; Pomares, Yuly B. / Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children. In: Child Development. 2007 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 53-69.
@article{1e1611dba1f043648fe61320dcdb1695,
title = "Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children",
abstract = "Infant joint attention has been observed to be related to social-emotional outcomes in at-risk children. To address whether this relation is also evident in typically developing children, 52 children were tested at 12, 15, 24, and 30 months to examine associations between infant joint attention and social outcomes. Twelve-month initiating and responding to joint attention were related to 30-month social competence and externalizing behavior, even when accounting for 15-month temperament ratings, 24-month cognition and language, and demographic variables. These results suggest that, in addition to associations with language and cognition, infant joint attention reflects robust aspects of development that are related to individual differences in the emergence of social and behavioral competence in childhood.",
author = "{Vaughan Van Hecke}, Amy and Mundy, {Peter Clive} and Acra, {C. Fran{\cc}oise} and Block, {Jessica J.} and Delgado, {Christine E F} and Parlade, {Meaghan V.} and Meyer, {Jessica A.} and Neal, {A. Rebecca} and Pomares, {Yuly B.}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "78",
pages = "53--69",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infant joint attention, temperament, and social competence in preschool children

AU - Vaughan Van Hecke, Amy

AU - Mundy, Peter Clive

AU - Acra, C. Françoise

AU - Block, Jessica J.

AU - Delgado, Christine E F

AU - Parlade, Meaghan V.

AU - Meyer, Jessica A.

AU - Neal, A. Rebecca

AU - Pomares, Yuly B.

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Infant joint attention has been observed to be related to social-emotional outcomes in at-risk children. To address whether this relation is also evident in typically developing children, 52 children were tested at 12, 15, 24, and 30 months to examine associations between infant joint attention and social outcomes. Twelve-month initiating and responding to joint attention were related to 30-month social competence and externalizing behavior, even when accounting for 15-month temperament ratings, 24-month cognition and language, and demographic variables. These results suggest that, in addition to associations with language and cognition, infant joint attention reflects robust aspects of development that are related to individual differences in the emergence of social and behavioral competence in childhood.

AB - Infant joint attention has been observed to be related to social-emotional outcomes in at-risk children. To address whether this relation is also evident in typically developing children, 52 children were tested at 12, 15, 24, and 30 months to examine associations between infant joint attention and social outcomes. Twelve-month initiating and responding to joint attention were related to 30-month social competence and externalizing behavior, even when accounting for 15-month temperament ratings, 24-month cognition and language, and demographic variables. These results suggest that, in addition to associations with language and cognition, infant joint attention reflects robust aspects of development that are related to individual differences in the emergence of social and behavioral competence in childhood.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847390255&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847390255&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x

M3 - Article

VL - 78

SP - 53

EP - 69

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 1

ER -