Infant feeding in America

Enough to break a mother's heart?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death of women around the world. Diet, exercise, smoking cessation, and blood pressure control are all recognized as key elements of preventing cardiovascular disease. Infant feeding has received less attention, but the studies reviewed here indicate that lactation may also play an important role in determining women's future risk of heart disease. A growing body of literature indicates that mothers who prematurely discontinue lactation face increased risk of visceral adiposity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and subclinical cardiovascular disease, as well as cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Breastfeeding is not always easy, but neither is dieting, exercise, smoking cessation, or treating hypertension. In order to effectively fight heart disease, efforts are needed to promote all aspects of a healthy lifestyle, which for women includes breastfeeding their babies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-457
Number of pages4
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiovascular Diseases
Mothers
Smoking Cessation
Breast Feeding
Lactation
Heart Diseases
Exercise
Hypertension
Adiposity
Hyperlipidemias
Cause of Death
Diet
Blood Pressure
Morbidity
Mortality
Healthy Lifestyle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics
  • Health Policy
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

Infant feeding in America : Enough to break a mother's heart? / Schwarz, Eleanor.

In: Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.10.2013, p. 454-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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