Induction immunosuppressive therapy is associated with a low rejection rate after liver transplantation

John McVicar, Kris Kowdley, Mary J. Emond, Darlene Barr, Christopher L. Marsh, Robert L. Carithers, James D. Perkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite advances in immunosuppression, allograft rejection occurs frequently after liver transplantation. The use of induction therapy with cytolytic antibodies may decrease the frequency of rejection in liver transplant recipients, but may also increase the rate of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. It has been our center's strategy to use induction therapy in our liver transplant recipients. To determine the outcome of our strategy, we retrospectively reviewed all liver transplants performed in the first 5 yr of our liver transplant program. The frequency of acute rejection in the first year after liver transplantation was only 34% in patients who received induction therapy. The type of induction therapy antibody did not affect the rejection rate. Clinically significant CMV infection (requiring treatment) occurred in 22% of patients. These results suggest that use of induction therapy with cytolytic antibodies does not lead to a high incidence of CMV infection and decreases the incidence of rejection after liver transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-333
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1997

Keywords

  • Anti-thymocyte globulin
  • Cyclosporine
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Minnesota antilymphoblast globulin
  • Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease
  • United Network for Organ Sharing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

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    McVicar, J., Kowdley, K., Emond, M. J., Barr, D., Marsh, C. L., Carithers, R. L., & Perkins, J. D. (1997). Induction immunosuppressive therapy is associated with a low rejection rate after liver transplantation. Clinical Transplantation, 11(4), 328-333.