Inducing iPSCs to Escape the dish

Bonnie Barrilleaux, Paul S Knoepfler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for autologous cell therapies, but significant roadblocks remain to translating iPSCs to the bedside. For example, concerns about the presumed autologous transplantation potential of iPSCs have been raised by a recent paper demonstrating that iPSC-derived teratomas were rejected by syngeneic hosts. Additionally, the reprogramming process can alter genomic and epigenomic states, so a key goal at this point is to determine the clinical relevance of these changes and minimize those that prove to be deleterious. Finally, thus far few studies have examined the efficacy and tumorigenicity of iPSCs in clinically relevant transplantation scenarios, an essential requirement for the FDA. We discuss potential solutions to these hurdles to provide a roadmap for iPSCs to "jump the dish" and become useful therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-111
Number of pages9
JournalCell Stem Cell
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2011

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Autologous Transplantation
Teratoma
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Epigenomics
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics

Cite this

Inducing iPSCs to Escape the dish. / Barrilleaux, Bonnie; Knoepfler, Paul S.

In: Cell Stem Cell, Vol. 9, No. 2, 05.08.2011, p. 103-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barrilleaux, Bonnie ; Knoepfler, Paul S. / Inducing iPSCs to Escape the dish. In: Cell Stem Cell. 2011 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 103-111.
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