Individual differences in infant attention skills, joint attention, and emotion regulation behaviour

Michael Morales, Peter Clive Mundy, Mary M. Crowson, A. Rebecca Neal, Christine E F Delgado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the concurrent and predictive relations between infant attention skills, joint attention, and emotion regulation. Infants' gaze following skills and duration of orienting were assessed at 6 months of age, and collaborative joint attention and emotion regulation skills were assessed at 24 months of age. The results indicated that infants' ability to follow direction of gaze at 6 months was significantly correlated with emotion regulation strategy use at 24 months of age, and that collaborative joint attention at 24 months was significantly correlated with emotion regulation strategy use at 24 months of age. The results of this study are consistent with previous research finding associations between collaborative joint attention and children's emotion regulation behaviour. These data also suggest that children's preexisting visual attention skills may contribute to their ability to regulate emotion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-263
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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