Individual and family factors associated with intention to quit among male Vietnamese American smokers

Implications for intervention development

Janice Y. Tsoh, Elisa Tong, Ginny Gildengorin, Tung T. Nguyen, Mary V. Modayil, Ching Wong, Stephen J. McPhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking prevalence among Vietnamese American males remains higher than the U.S. general population. This study examined the associations of individual and family factors with quit intention among Vietnamese male smokers in California to guide intervention development to reduce their smoking prevalence. Data for Vietnamese male current smokers (n = 234) in the 2008 California Vietnamese Adult Tobacco Use Survey (N = 1101 males) were analyzed to describe quit intention and previous quit attempts. One-third of Vietnamese male smokers (33%) had no intention to quit at any time, 36% intended to quit soon (in the next 30. days), and 31% intended to quit later (beyond the next 30. days). Half (51.7%) of the sample was in "precontemplation," indicating no intention to quit within 6. months. Many (71%) had made a serious quit attempt in the past year, but 68% of those who tried to quit used no cessation assistance. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for age, depression, smoking intensity, nicotine dependence, health knowledge, children in the household and home smoking ban revealed that having smoking-related family conflicts and a quit attempt in the past year with or without assistance were independently associated with an intention to quit either in the next 30. days or later. Higher education was associated with no intention to quit. Findings underscore the importance of designing strategic interventions that meet the needs of smokers at both individual and family levels to promote quit intention and to facilitate successful quitting in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-301
Number of pages8
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Asian Americans
Tobacco
Nicotine
Logistics
Education
Health
Smoking
Family Conflict
Tobacco Use Disorder
Tobacco Use
Population
Logistic Models
Depression

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • Intention to quit
  • Smoking cessation
  • Tobacco use
  • Vietnamese Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Individual and family factors associated with intention to quit among male Vietnamese American smokers : Implications for intervention development. / Tsoh, Janice Y.; Tong, Elisa; Gildengorin, Ginny; Nguyen, Tung T.; Modayil, Mary V.; Wong, Ching; McPhee, Stephen J.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 36, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 294-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsoh, Janice Y. ; Tong, Elisa ; Gildengorin, Ginny ; Nguyen, Tung T. ; Modayil, Mary V. ; Wong, Ching ; McPhee, Stephen J. / Individual and family factors associated with intention to quit among male Vietnamese American smokers : Implications for intervention development. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 4. pp. 294-301.
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