Indicators of linguistic competence in the peer group conversational behavior of mildly retarded adults

Sheldon Rosenberg, Leonard J Abbeduto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Samples of the communicative behavior of a group of higher-level mentally retarded adults engaged in conversation with peers were examined for indications of mature linguistic competence, specifically, grammatical morpheme and complex sentence use. The findings confirmed the expectation that the eventual level of mastery of these aspects of linguistic competence in higher-level retarded individuals is relatively high. Evidence for a normal developmental progression in the mastery of the grammatical morphemes was also forthcoming. In an analysis of individual complex sentence structures, no relationship was found between relative frequency of use of different types of complex sentences and presumed order of acquisition. However, subjects’ ability to combine complex sentences did appear to be related to the presumed order of acquisition, although other factors may have also contributed to this relationship. Unexpectedly, a significant negative correlation was observed between relative frequency of complex sentence use and an estimate of conversational communicative competence. A possible reason for this finding was discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-32
Number of pages14
JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

linguistic competence
Peer Group
peer group
Linguistics
Mental Competency
communicative competence
indication
Aptitude
conversation
Mentally Disabled Persons
ability
evidence
Group
Linguistic Competence
Complex Sentences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Indicators of linguistic competence in the peer group conversational behavior of mildly retarded adults. / Rosenberg, Sheldon; Abbeduto, Leonard J.

In: Applied Psycholinguistics, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1987, p. 19-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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