Indications, management, and outcome of long-term positive-pressure ventilation in dogs and cats

148 Cases (1990-2001)

Katrina Hopper, Steve C. Haskins, Philip H Kass, Marlis L. Rezende, Janet Aldrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine outcome of positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) for 24 hours or longer and identify factors associated with successful weaning from PPV and survival to hospital discharge in dogs and cats. Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 124 dogs and 24 cats that received PPV for 24 hours or longer. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for signalment, primary diagnosis, reason for initiating PPV, measures of oxygenation and ventilation before and during PPV, ventilator settings, complications, duration of PPV, and outcome. Animals were categorized into 1 of 3 groups on the basis of the reason for PPV. Results - Group 1 patients received PPV for inadequate oxygenation (67 dogs and 6 cats), group 2 for inadequate ventilation (46 dogs and 16 cats), and group 3 for inadequate oxygenation and ventilation (11 dogs and 2 cats). Of the group 1 animals, 36% (26/73) were weaned from PPV and 22% (16/73) survived to hospital discharge. In group 2, 50% (31/62) were weaned from PPV and 39% (24/62) survived to hospital discharge. In group 3, 3 of 13 were weaned from PPV and 1 of 13 survived to hospital discharge. Likelihood of successful weaning and survival to hospital discharge were significantly higher for group 2 animals, and cats had a significantly lower likelihood of successful weaning from PPV, compared with dogs. Median duration of PPV was 48 hours (range, 24 to 356 hours) and was not associated with outcome. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggested that long-term PPV is practical and successful in dogs and cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-75
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume230
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Positive-Pressure Respiration
Cats
Dogs
cats
dogs
Weaning
Ventilation
weaning
animals
ventilators
duration
Survival
Mechanical Ventilators
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Indications, management, and outcome of long-term positive-pressure ventilation in dogs and cats : 148 Cases (1990-2001). / Hopper, Katrina; Haskins, Steve C.; Kass, Philip H; Rezende, Marlis L.; Aldrich, Janet.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 230, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 64-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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