Indications and performance of pelvic radiography in patients with blunt trauma

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Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this study are to validate a set of clinical variables to identify patients with pelvic fractures and to determine the sensitivity of anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs in patients with pelvic fractures. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of adults (>18 years) with blunt torso trauma evaluated with abdominal/pelvic computed tomography. Physicians providing care in the emergency department documented history and physical examination findings after initial evaluation. High-risk variables included any of the following: hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg), Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 14, pelvic bone tenderness, or instability. Pelvic fractures were present if the orthopedic faculty documented a fracture to the pubis, ilium, ischium, or sacrum. Results: We enrolled 4737 patients, including 289 (6.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4%-6.8%) with pelvic fractures. Of the 289 patients, 256 (88.6%; 95% CI, 84.3%-92.0%) had at least one of the high-risk variables identified. Initial plain AP radiographs identified 234 (81.0%; 95% CI, 76.0%-85.3%) of 289 patients with pelvic fractures. The high-risk variables identified all 87 patients (100%; 95% CI, 96.6%-100%) undergoing surgery, whereas plain AP pelvic radiography identified a fracture in 83 patients (95.4%; 95% CI, 88.6%-98.7%) undergoing surgery. Conclusion: Previously identified high-risk variables for pelvic fracture identify most but not all patients with pelvic fractures. However, these high-risk variables identify all patients undergoing surgery and may be implemented as screening criteria for pelvic radiography. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs fail to demonstrate a fracture in a substantial number of patients with pelvic fracture including patients who undergo surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1129-1133
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Radiography
Wounds and Injuries
Confidence Intervals
Ischium
Pubic Bone
Pelvic Bones
Ilium
Blood Pressure
Torso
Sacrum
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hypotension
Physical Examination
Observational Studies
Orthopedics
Hospital Emergency Service
Cohort Studies
History
Tomography
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Indications and performance of pelvic radiography in patients with blunt trauma",
abstract = "Objectives: The objectives of this study are to validate a set of clinical variables to identify patients with pelvic fractures and to determine the sensitivity of anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs in patients with pelvic fractures. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of adults (>18 years) with blunt torso trauma evaluated with abdominal/pelvic computed tomography. Physicians providing care in the emergency department documented history and physical examination findings after initial evaluation. High-risk variables included any of the following: hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg), Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 14, pelvic bone tenderness, or instability. Pelvic fractures were present if the orthopedic faculty documented a fracture to the pubis, ilium, ischium, or sacrum. Results: We enrolled 4737 patients, including 289 (6.1{\%}; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 5.4{\%}-6.8{\%}) with pelvic fractures. Of the 289 patients, 256 (88.6{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 84.3{\%}-92.0{\%}) had at least one of the high-risk variables identified. Initial plain AP radiographs identified 234 (81.0{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 76.0{\%}-85.3{\%}) of 289 patients with pelvic fractures. The high-risk variables identified all 87 patients (100{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 96.6{\%}-100{\%}) undergoing surgery, whereas plain AP pelvic radiography identified a fracture in 83 patients (95.4{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 88.6{\%}-98.7{\%}) undergoing surgery. Conclusion: Previously identified high-risk variables for pelvic fracture identify most but not all patients with pelvic fractures. However, these high-risk variables identify all patients undergoing surgery and may be implemented as screening criteria for pelvic radiography. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs fail to demonstrate a fracture in a substantial number of patients with pelvic fracture including patients who undergo surgery.",
author = "{Holmes Jr}, {James F} and Wisner, {David H}",
year = "2012",
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T1 - Indications and performance of pelvic radiography in patients with blunt trauma

AU - Holmes Jr, James F

AU - Wisner, David H

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Objectives: The objectives of this study are to validate a set of clinical variables to identify patients with pelvic fractures and to determine the sensitivity of anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs in patients with pelvic fractures. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of adults (>18 years) with blunt torso trauma evaluated with abdominal/pelvic computed tomography. Physicians providing care in the emergency department documented history and physical examination findings after initial evaluation. High-risk variables included any of the following: hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg), Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 14, pelvic bone tenderness, or instability. Pelvic fractures were present if the orthopedic faculty documented a fracture to the pubis, ilium, ischium, or sacrum. Results: We enrolled 4737 patients, including 289 (6.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4%-6.8%) with pelvic fractures. Of the 289 patients, 256 (88.6%; 95% CI, 84.3%-92.0%) had at least one of the high-risk variables identified. Initial plain AP radiographs identified 234 (81.0%; 95% CI, 76.0%-85.3%) of 289 patients with pelvic fractures. The high-risk variables identified all 87 patients (100%; 95% CI, 96.6%-100%) undergoing surgery, whereas plain AP pelvic radiography identified a fracture in 83 patients (95.4%; 95% CI, 88.6%-98.7%) undergoing surgery. Conclusion: Previously identified high-risk variables for pelvic fracture identify most but not all patients with pelvic fractures. However, these high-risk variables identify all patients undergoing surgery and may be implemented as screening criteria for pelvic radiography. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs fail to demonstrate a fracture in a substantial number of patients with pelvic fracture including patients who undergo surgery.

AB - Objectives: The objectives of this study are to validate a set of clinical variables to identify patients with pelvic fractures and to determine the sensitivity of anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs in patients with pelvic fractures. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of adults (>18 years) with blunt torso trauma evaluated with abdominal/pelvic computed tomography. Physicians providing care in the emergency department documented history and physical examination findings after initial evaluation. High-risk variables included any of the following: hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg), Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 14, pelvic bone tenderness, or instability. Pelvic fractures were present if the orthopedic faculty documented a fracture to the pubis, ilium, ischium, or sacrum. Results: We enrolled 4737 patients, including 289 (6.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4%-6.8%) with pelvic fractures. Of the 289 patients, 256 (88.6%; 95% CI, 84.3%-92.0%) had at least one of the high-risk variables identified. Initial plain AP radiographs identified 234 (81.0%; 95% CI, 76.0%-85.3%) of 289 patients with pelvic fractures. The high-risk variables identified all 87 patients (100%; 95% CI, 96.6%-100%) undergoing surgery, whereas plain AP pelvic radiography identified a fracture in 83 patients (95.4%; 95% CI, 88.6%-98.7%) undergoing surgery. Conclusion: Previously identified high-risk variables for pelvic fracture identify most but not all patients with pelvic fractures. However, these high-risk variables identify all patients undergoing surgery and may be implemented as screening criteria for pelvic radiography. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs fail to demonstrate a fracture in a substantial number of patients with pelvic fracture including patients who undergo surgery.

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