Increased adipose tissue insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome: Relationship to circulating adipokines

Beverley Adams-Huet, Sridevi Devaraj, David Siegel, Ishwarlal Jialal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although hepatic insulin resistance has been documented in patients with metabolic syndrome using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) as a measure, there is scanty data on adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) and its relationship with the dysregulation of adipokines in metabolic syndrome. Thus, we examined whether Adipo-IR is increased in metabolic syndrome as well as its correlation with circulating adipokines. Methods: In 42 individuals including controls and participants with metabolic syndrome, we measured fasting plasma insulin and free fatty acids (FFA). Adipo-IR was calculated as the product of FFA×insulin. We examined the association between Adipo-IR, metabolic syndrome variables, and circulating adipokines, including leptin, adiponectin, chemerin, omentin-1, and retinol-binding protein-4. Results: Adipo-IR was higher in metabolic syndrome (n=19; median 68.7mmol/L·pmol/L; 25th-75th percentile, 50.0-104.7) compared to controls (n=23; 22.9mmol/L·pmol/L; 6.8-36.1; P<0.0001), and this difference was similar following adjustments for waist circumference or body mass index (BMI). Adipo-IR correlated significantly with certain adipokines: Leptin, r=0.45, P=0.004; adiponectin, r=-0.33, P<0.05; chemerin r=0.55, P=0.0008; omentin-1, r=-0.46, P=0.04, and with all features of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions: Adipo-IR is increased in metabolic syndrome following adjustment for adiposity and may be an important biomarker of adipose tissue dysregulation, including adipokine secretion and a potential relevant therapeutic target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-507
Number of pages5
JournalMetabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Adipokines
Insulin Resistance
Adipose Tissue
Adiponectin
Leptin
Cellular Retinol-Binding Proteins
Adiposity
Waist Circumference
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Fasting
Body Mass Index
Homeostasis
Biomarkers
Insulin
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Increased adipose tissue insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome : Relationship to circulating adipokines. / Adams-Huet, Beverley; Devaraj, Sridevi; Siegel, David; Jialal, Ishwarlal.

In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, Vol. 12, No. 10, 01.12.2014, p. 503-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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