Increase in myocardial oxygen consumption indexes by exercise training at onset of ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease

L. J. Laslett, L. Paumer, Ezra A Amsterdam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been unclear whether exercise training of patients with coronary artery disease increases the level of myocardial oxygen consumption, as indicated by heart rate and double product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure, at which electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial ischemia develops. To assess this question we evaluated the experience of 10 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent a modest-level exercise training program for 6 months. All of these subjects had achieved a training effect, had developed electrocardiographic evidence of ischemia during initial exercise testing, had not increased the amount of cardiac medication taken, and had not been taking digoxin. After completion of the training period, the mean heart rate at which electrocardiographic evidence of ischemia developed increased from 107 ± 19 to 119 ± 23 beats/min (p < .05) and the mean double product increased from 166 ± 18 to 209 ± 51 x 102 mm Hg x beats/min (P < .05). Eight of the 10 patients demonstrated an increase in heart rate at onset of ischemia (p < .02), and seven of the eight in whom double product could be assessed manifested an increase in this parameter at onset of ischemia (p < .05). Thus the rate of myocardial oxygen consumption at which myocardial ischemia develops, as indirectly assessed by heart rate and double product, can be favorably altered by 6 months of moderate-level exercise training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)958-962
Number of pages5
JournalCirculation
Volume71
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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