Incidentally detected biliary ductal dilatation on contrast-enhanced CT: what is the incidence of occult obstructing malignancy?

James S. Chalfant, Alton W. Skaggs, Thomas W. Loehfelm, Ghaneh Fananapazir, Michael T. Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of occult obstructing malignancy in the setting of asymptomatic biliary ductal dilatation incidentally detected and without identifiable cause on contrast-enhanced CT. Methods: A retrospective search identified patients with biliary ductal dilatation on contrast-enhanced CT from March 30, 2007 to November 1, 2017. Patients with biliary symptomatology or clinical concern for an obstructing process, an explanation for biliary ductal dilatation on index CT, intrahepatic without extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation, concurrent pancreatic ductal dilatation, and inadequate follow-up were excluded. A reference standard of at least 1 year of imaging follow-up or 2 years of clinical follow-up was used to exclude occult obstructing malignancy. Results: 156 patients were included; 120 patients met imaging follow-up criteria and 36 patients met clinical follow-up criteria. No cases of occult malignancy were identified as the source of biliary ductal dilatation (95% CI 0.0–1.9%). LFTs were available for 131 patients, of which 36 were elevated (27%). One case demonstrated a 1.2-cm ampullary adenoma on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (occult on follow-up MRI, normal LFTs at the time of the index CT). Conclusion: Asymptomatic biliary ductal dilatation incidentally detected and without identifiable cause on contrast-enhanced CT is likely benign in patients with normal LFTs, and further workup may not be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4022-4027
Number of pages6
JournalAbdominal Radiology
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Keywords

  • Bile ducts
  • Biliary ductal dilation
  • Incidental
  • Malignancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology
  • Urology

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