Incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and secondary thromboembolism among ethnic groups in California

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Abstract

Background: Few studies have compared the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Objective: To determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Design: Analysis of the linked California Patient Discharge Data Set from 1991 to 1994. Setting: California. Patients: 17 991 patients with idiopathic deep venous thrombosis (thrombosis without cancer or hospitalization within preceding 6 months) and 5573 patients with secondary thromboembolism (thromboembolism occurring within 3 months of seven different events). Measurements: Ethnicity was determined by using race as documented in the data set. For idiopathic deep venous thrombosis, standardized age- and sex-adjusted incidences were calculated. For secondary thromboembolism, proportional hazards modeling was done. Results: The annual incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis per 1 000 000 persons older than 18 years of age was 230 for white persons, 293 for African Americans (rate ratio, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51]), 139 for Hispanic persons (rate ratio, 0.60 [CI, 0.54 to 0.67]), and 60 for Asians and Pacific Islanders (rate ratio, 0.26 [CI, 0.22 to 0.30]). Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders who developed secondary thromboembolism had a significantly lower relative risk (range, 0.22 to 0.61) for all seven conditions analyzed. Conclusions: Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders have a very low incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and a very low relative risk for secondary venous thromboembolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)737-740
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume128
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 1998

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Thromboembolism
Ethnic Groups
Venous Thrombosis
Incidence
Patient Discharge
Venous Thromboembolism
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Hospitalization
Thrombosis
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{1e515d0ed9b54cc688a7b2672309efcc,
title = "Incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and secondary thromboembolism among ethnic groups in California",
abstract = "Background: Few studies have compared the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Objective: To determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Design: Analysis of the linked California Patient Discharge Data Set from 1991 to 1994. Setting: California. Patients: 17 991 patients with idiopathic deep venous thrombosis (thrombosis without cancer or hospitalization within preceding 6 months) and 5573 patients with secondary thromboembolism (thromboembolism occurring within 3 months of seven different events). Measurements: Ethnicity was determined by using race as documented in the data set. For idiopathic deep venous thrombosis, standardized age- and sex-adjusted incidences were calculated. For secondary thromboembolism, proportional hazards modeling was done. Results: The annual incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis per 1 000 000 persons older than 18 years of age was 230 for white persons, 293 for African Americans (rate ratio, 1.27 [95{\%} CI, 1.07 to 1.51]), 139 for Hispanic persons (rate ratio, 0.60 [CI, 0.54 to 0.67]), and 60 for Asians and Pacific Islanders (rate ratio, 0.26 [CI, 0.22 to 0.30]). Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders who developed secondary thromboembolism had a significantly lower relative risk (range, 0.22 to 0.61) for all seven conditions analyzed. Conclusions: Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders have a very low incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and a very low relative risk for secondary venous thromboembolism.",
author = "White, {Richard H} and Hong Zhou and Romano, {Patrick S}",
year = "1998",
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T1 - Incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and secondary thromboembolism among ethnic groups in California

AU - White, Richard H

AU - Zhou, Hong

AU - Romano, Patrick S

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Y1 - 1998/5/1

N2 - Background: Few studies have compared the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Objective: To determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Design: Analysis of the linked California Patient Discharge Data Set from 1991 to 1994. Setting: California. Patients: 17 991 patients with idiopathic deep venous thrombosis (thrombosis without cancer or hospitalization within preceding 6 months) and 5573 patients with secondary thromboembolism (thromboembolism occurring within 3 months of seven different events). Measurements: Ethnicity was determined by using race as documented in the data set. For idiopathic deep venous thrombosis, standardized age- and sex-adjusted incidences were calculated. For secondary thromboembolism, proportional hazards modeling was done. Results: The annual incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis per 1 000 000 persons older than 18 years of age was 230 for white persons, 293 for African Americans (rate ratio, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51]), 139 for Hispanic persons (rate ratio, 0.60 [CI, 0.54 to 0.67]), and 60 for Asians and Pacific Islanders (rate ratio, 0.26 [CI, 0.22 to 0.30]). Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders who developed secondary thromboembolism had a significantly lower relative risk (range, 0.22 to 0.61) for all seven conditions analyzed. Conclusions: Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders have a very low incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and a very low relative risk for secondary venous thromboembolism.

AB - Background: Few studies have compared the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Objective: To determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis among ethnic groups. Design: Analysis of the linked California Patient Discharge Data Set from 1991 to 1994. Setting: California. Patients: 17 991 patients with idiopathic deep venous thrombosis (thrombosis without cancer or hospitalization within preceding 6 months) and 5573 patients with secondary thromboembolism (thromboembolism occurring within 3 months of seven different events). Measurements: Ethnicity was determined by using race as documented in the data set. For idiopathic deep venous thrombosis, standardized age- and sex-adjusted incidences were calculated. For secondary thromboembolism, proportional hazards modeling was done. Results: The annual incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis per 1 000 000 persons older than 18 years of age was 230 for white persons, 293 for African Americans (rate ratio, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51]), 139 for Hispanic persons (rate ratio, 0.60 [CI, 0.54 to 0.67]), and 60 for Asians and Pacific Islanders (rate ratio, 0.26 [CI, 0.22 to 0.30]). Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders who developed secondary thromboembolism had a significantly lower relative risk (range, 0.22 to 0.61) for all seven conditions analyzed. Conclusions: Compared with white persons, Asians and Pacific Islanders have a very low incidence of idiopathic deep venous thrombosis and a very low relative risk for secondary venous thromboembolism.

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