Incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection among dogs in a small animal intensive care unit

Sean D. Smarick, Steve C. Haskins, Janet Aldrich, Janet E Foley, Philip H Kass, Mack Fudge, Gerald V. Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To determine incidence of and possible risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) among dogs hospitalized in an intensive care unit and compare results of bacterial culture of urine samples with results of bacterial culture of catheter tips. Design-Prospective study. Animals-39 dogs. Procedure-A standard protocol for aseptic catheter placement and maintenance was used. Urine samples were obtained daily and submitted for bacterial culture. When possible, the urinary catheter tip was collected aseptically at the time of catheter removal and submitted for bacterial culture. Bacteria that were obtained were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Results-4 of the 39 (10.3%) dogs developed a UTI. The probability of remaining free from UTI after 1 day in the intensive care unit was 94.9%, and the probability of remaining free from UTI after 4 days was 63.3%. Bacteria isolates were generally common urinary tract pathogens and were susceptible to most antimicrobials. Specific risk factors for catheter-associated UTI, beyond a lack of antimicrobial administration, were not identified. Positive predictive value of bacterial culture of urinary catheter tips was only 25%. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results suggest that placement of an indwelling urinary catheter in dogs is associated with a low risk of catheter-associated UTI during the first 3 days after catheter placement, provided that adequate precautions are taken for aseptic catheter placement and maintenance. Results of bacterial culture of urinary catheter tips should not be used to predict whether dogs developed catheter-associated UTI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1936-1940
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume224
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2004

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urinary tract diseases
Catheter-Related Infections
catheters
Urinary Tract Infections
Intensive Care Units
Urinary Catheters
Dogs
incidence
dogs
Catheters
Incidence
animals
Maintenance
Urine
Bacteria
anti-infective agents
Indwelling Catheters
Urinary Tract
urine
risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection among dogs in a small animal intensive care unit. / Smarick, Sean D.; Haskins, Steve C.; Aldrich, Janet; Foley, Janet E; Kass, Philip H; Fudge, Mack; Ling, Gerald V.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 224, No. 12, 15.06.2004, p. 1936-1940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smarick, Sean D. ; Haskins, Steve C. ; Aldrich, Janet ; Foley, Janet E ; Kass, Philip H ; Fudge, Mack ; Ling, Gerald V. / Incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection among dogs in a small animal intensive care unit. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2004 ; Vol. 224, No. 12. pp. 1936-1940.
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