Inadequacy of cardiovascular risk factor management in chronic kidney transplantation - evidence from the favorit study

Myra A. Carpenter, Matthew R. Weir, Deborah B. Adey, Andrew A. House, Andrew G. Bostom, John W. Kusek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) have increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our objective is to describe the prevalence of CVD risk factors applying standard criteria and use of CVD risk factor-lowering medications in contemporary KTRs. Methods: The Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation study enrolled and collected medication data on 4107 KTRs with elevated homocysteine and stable graft function an average of five yr post-transplant. Results: CVD risk factors were common (hypertension or use of blood pressure (BP) lowering medication in 92%, borderline or elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or use of lipid-lowering agent in 66%, history of diabetes mellitus in 41%, and obesity in 38%); prevalent CVD was reported in 20% of study participants. National Kidney Foundation BP guidelines (BP <130/80 mmHg) were not met by 69% of participants. Uncontrolled hypertension (BP of 140/90 mmHg or higher) was present in 44% of those taking antihypertension medication; 18% of participants had borderline or elevated LDL, of which 60% were untreated, and 31% of the participants with prevalent CVD were not using an antiplatelet agent. Conclusion: There is opportunity to improve treatment and control of traditional CVD risk factors in kidney transplant recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

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Risk Management
Kidney Transplantation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Kidney
Blood Pressure
LDL Lipoproteins
Hypertension
Transplants
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Homocysteine
Folic Acid
Blood Vessels
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Transplantation
Guidelines
Lipids
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cardiovascular risk factors
  • Kidney transplantation
  • Medical management
  • Medications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Inadequacy of cardiovascular risk factor management in chronic kidney transplantation - evidence from the favorit study. / Carpenter, Myra A.; Weir, Matthew R.; Adey, Deborah B.; House, Andrew A.; Bostom, Andrew G.; Kusek, John W.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 26, No. 4, 07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carpenter, Myra A. ; Weir, Matthew R. ; Adey, Deborah B. ; House, Andrew A. ; Bostom, Andrew G. ; Kusek, John W. / Inadequacy of cardiovascular risk factor management in chronic kidney transplantation - evidence from the favorit study. In: Clinical Transplantation. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 4.
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