In vivo effects of ozone exposure on protein adduct formation by 1-nitronaphthalene in rat lung

Åsa M. Wheelock, Bridget C. Boland, Margaret Isbell, Dexter Morin, Teresa C. Wegesser, Charles Plopper, Alan R Buckpitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of serious photochemical smog events is steadily growing in urban environments around the world. The electrophilic metabolites of 1-nitronaphthalene (1-NN), a common air pollutant in urban areas, have been shown to bind covalently to proteins. 1-NN specifically targets the airway epithelium, and the toxicity is synergized by prior long-term ozone exposure in rat. In this study we investigated the formation of 1-NN protein adducts in the rat airway epithelium in vivo and examined how prior long-term ozone exposure affects adduct formation. Eight adducted proteins, several involved in cellular antioxidant defense, were identified. The extent of adduction of each protein was calculated, and two proteins, peroxiredoxin 6 and biliverdin reductase, were adducted at high specific activities (0.36-0.70 and 1.0 nmol adduct/nmol protein). Furthermore, the N-terminal region of calreticulin, known as vaso-statin, was adducted only in ozone-exposed animals. Although vaso-statin was adducted at relatively low specific activity (0.01 nmol adduct/nmol protein), the adduction only in ozone-exposed animals makes it a candidate protein for elucidating the synergistic toxicity between ozone and 1-NN. These studies identified in vivo protein targets for reactive 1-NN metabolites that are potentially associated with the mechanism of 1-NN toxicity and the synergistic effects of ozone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-137
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

Fingerprint

Ozone
Rats
Lung
Proteins
Toxicity
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
biliverdin reductase
Metabolites
Peroxiredoxin VI
Animals
Epithelium
Smog
Calreticulin
1-nitronaphthalene
Air Pollutants
Antioxidants
Incidence

Keywords

  • 1-nitronaphthalene
  • Calreticulin
  • Ozone
  • Protein adduct
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

In vivo effects of ozone exposure on protein adduct formation by 1-nitronaphthalene in rat lung. / Wheelock, Åsa M.; Boland, Bridget C.; Isbell, Margaret; Morin, Dexter; Wegesser, Teresa C.; Plopper, Charles; Buckpitt, Alan R.

In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 08.2005, p. 130-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wheelock, Åsa M. ; Boland, Bridget C. ; Isbell, Margaret ; Morin, Dexter ; Wegesser, Teresa C. ; Plopper, Charles ; Buckpitt, Alan R. / In vivo effects of ozone exposure on protein adduct formation by 1-nitronaphthalene in rat lung. In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 130-137.
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