In vivo effects of naproxen on composition, proteoglycan metabolism, and matrix metalloproteinase activities in canine articular cartilage

A. Ratcliffe, W. Azzo, F. Saed-Nejad, Nancy E Lane, P. Rosenwasser, V. C. Mow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used in the clinical treatment of joint disease. In this study, its effect in vivo on the biochemical composition, metabolic activities, and metalloproteinase activities of normal canine articular cartilage was analyzed. The articular cartilage from the knee joints of dogs who had been given naproxen for 4 weeks to maintain a serum level of 40-50 μg/ml was examined. Control animals were given a placebo. Treatment with naproxen was not found to change the composition (water, collagen, and proteoglycan) of the articular cartilage. The culture studies of cartilage explants indicated that proteoglycan synthesis rates were unaffected by the treatment with naproxen but that proteoglycan release from the tissue was suppressed. Analysis of the cartilage for matrix metalloproteinase activities showed reduced activity of neutral matrix metalloproteinase by 80%, of collagenase by 40%, and of gelatinase by 87%, with no change in activity of acid metalloproteinase or of tissue inhibitor for metalloproteinase. These findings indicate that in vivo treatment with naproxen has the capacity to modulate catabolic activities in articular cartilage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-171
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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