In vivo cytometry

A spectrum of possibilities

Alice Chung, Scott Karlan, Erik Lindsley, Sebastian Wachsmann-Hogiu, Daniel L. Farkas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We investigate whether optical imaging can reliably detect abnormalities in tissue, in a range of specimens (live cells in vitro; fixed, fresh ex-vivo and in vivo tissue), without the use of added contrast agents, and review our promising spectral methods for achieving quantitative, real-time, high resolution intrasurgical optical diagnostics. Methods: We use reflectance, fluorescence, two-photon, and Mie scattering imaging, performed with instrumentation we developed or modified, to detect intrinsic tissue signatures. Emphasis is on spectral/hyperspectral imaging approaches allowing the equivalent of in vivo pathology. Results: With experimental focus on unstained specimens, we demonstrate the ability to segment tissue images for cancer detection. Spectral reflectance imaging, coupled with advanced analysis, typically yields 90% specificity and sensitivity. Autofluorescence is also shown to be diagnostically useful, with lymph nodes results highlighted here. Elastic scattering hyperspectral imaging endoscopy, using a new instrument we designed and built, shows promise in bronchoscopic detection of dysplasia and early cancer in patients. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that advanced optical imaging can detect and localize cellular signatures of cancer in real-time, in vivo, without the use of contrast agents, in animals and humans. This is an important step towards tight spatio-temporal coupling between such detection and clinical intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-146
Number of pages5
JournalCytometry Part A
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Optical Imaging
Contrast Media
Photons
Early Detection of Cancer
Endoscopy
Neoplasms
Fluorescence
Lymph Nodes
Pathology
Sensitivity and Specificity
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Elastic scattering imaging endoscopy
  • In vivo cytometry
  • Optical diagnostics
  • Spectral imaging
  • Unstained specimens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Biophysics
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Chung, A., Karlan, S., Lindsley, E., Wachsmann-Hogiu, S., & Farkas, D. L. (2006). In vivo cytometry: A spectrum of possibilities. Cytometry Part A, 69(3), 142-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/cyto.a.20220

In vivo cytometry : A spectrum of possibilities. / Chung, Alice; Karlan, Scott; Lindsley, Erik; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Farkas, Daniel L.

In: Cytometry Part A, Vol. 69, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 142-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, A, Karlan, S, Lindsley, E, Wachsmann-Hogiu, S & Farkas, DL 2006, 'In vivo cytometry: A spectrum of possibilities', Cytometry Part A, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 142-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/cyto.a.20220
Chung, Alice ; Karlan, Scott ; Lindsley, Erik ; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian ; Farkas, Daniel L. / In vivo cytometry : A spectrum of possibilities. In: Cytometry Part A. 2006 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 142-146.
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