In vitro study of the effectiveness of three commercial adsorbents for binding oleander toxins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Oleander (Nerium oleander) poisoning is a common problem found in many parts of the world. The oleander toxicity is due to oleandrin and its aglycone metabolite oleandrigenin. Activated charcoal is a useful gastrointestinal decontamination agent that limits the absorption of ingested toxins. A relatively new clay product, Bio-SpongeTM, containing di-tri-octahedral smectite as the active ingredient, is also recommended for adsorbing bacterial toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Bio-Sponge TM has been used to prevent gastrointestinal absorption of oleander toxins in livestock but the efficacy of activated charcoal and Bio-Sponge TM for adsorbing oleandrin and oleandrigenin has not yet been studied. Methods: An in vitro experiment to compare the efficacy of three commercially available adsorbents was performed. The adsorbents include Bio-SpongeTM, ToxiBanTM granules, and a generic grade activated charcoal. Results: ToxiBanTM granules have the highest adsorptive capacity, followed by the generic grade activated charcoal, and finally, Bio-SpongeTM. Discussion: Bio-SpongeTM did not adsorb oleandrin and oleandrigenin at concentrations that are expected to be present in the gastrointestinal tract of poisoned animals. Conclusions: On the basis of this in vitro study, products containing activated charcoal are more effective for binding oleander toxins and providing gastrointestinal decontamination than products containing di-tri-octahedral smectite. However, the ability of these adsorbents to alter the clinical outcome in oleander-poisoned animals or humans is yet to be evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-218
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Toxicology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Nerium
Charcoal
Adsorbents
Decontamination
Porifera
Gastrointestinal Tract
Animals
Clay products
Bacterial Toxins
Gastrointestinal Agents
Livestock
Metabolites
Poisoning
Agriculture
Toxicity
In Vitro Techniques
oleandrin
oleandrigenin

Keywords

  • Activated charcoal
  • Acute poisoning
  • Adsorption
  • Toxic plants
  • Toxins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

In vitro study of the effectiveness of three commercial adsorbents for binding oleander toxins. / Tiwary, Asheesh K.; Poppenga, Robert H; Puschner, Birgit.

In: Clinical Toxicology, Vol. 47, No. 3, 2009, p. 213-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: Oleander (Nerium oleander) poisoning is a common problem found in many parts of the world. The oleander toxicity is due to oleandrin and its aglycone metabolite oleandrigenin. Activated charcoal is a useful gastrointestinal decontamination agent that limits the absorption of ingested toxins. A relatively new clay product, Bio-SpongeTM, containing di-tri-octahedral smectite as the active ingredient, is also recommended for adsorbing bacterial toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Bio-Sponge TM has been used to prevent gastrointestinal absorption of oleander toxins in livestock but the efficacy of activated charcoal and Bio-Sponge TM for adsorbing oleandrin and oleandrigenin has not yet been studied. Methods: An in vitro experiment to compare the efficacy of three commercially available adsorbents was performed. The adsorbents include Bio-SpongeTM, ToxiBanTM granules, and a generic grade activated charcoal. Results: ToxiBanTM granules have the highest adsorptive capacity, followed by the generic grade activated charcoal, and finally, Bio-SpongeTM. Discussion: Bio-SpongeTM did not adsorb oleandrin and oleandrigenin at concentrations that are expected to be present in the gastrointestinal tract of poisoned animals. Conclusions: On the basis of this in vitro study, products containing activated charcoal are more effective for binding oleander toxins and providing gastrointestinal decontamination than products containing di-tri-octahedral smectite. However, the ability of these adsorbents to alter the clinical outcome in oleander-poisoned animals or humans is yet to be evaluated.",
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N2 - Introduction: Oleander (Nerium oleander) poisoning is a common problem found in many parts of the world. The oleander toxicity is due to oleandrin and its aglycone metabolite oleandrigenin. Activated charcoal is a useful gastrointestinal decontamination agent that limits the absorption of ingested toxins. A relatively new clay product, Bio-SpongeTM, containing di-tri-octahedral smectite as the active ingredient, is also recommended for adsorbing bacterial toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Bio-Sponge TM has been used to prevent gastrointestinal absorption of oleander toxins in livestock but the efficacy of activated charcoal and Bio-Sponge TM for adsorbing oleandrin and oleandrigenin has not yet been studied. Methods: An in vitro experiment to compare the efficacy of three commercially available adsorbents was performed. The adsorbents include Bio-SpongeTM, ToxiBanTM granules, and a generic grade activated charcoal. Results: ToxiBanTM granules have the highest adsorptive capacity, followed by the generic grade activated charcoal, and finally, Bio-SpongeTM. Discussion: Bio-SpongeTM did not adsorb oleandrin and oleandrigenin at concentrations that are expected to be present in the gastrointestinal tract of poisoned animals. Conclusions: On the basis of this in vitro study, products containing activated charcoal are more effective for binding oleander toxins and providing gastrointestinal decontamination than products containing di-tri-octahedral smectite. However, the ability of these adsorbents to alter the clinical outcome in oleander-poisoned animals or humans is yet to be evaluated.

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