In search of cellular immunophenotypes in the blood of children with autism

Paul Ashwood, Blythe A. Corbett, Aaron Kantor, Howard Schulman, Judith A Van de Water, David G Amaral

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social behavior, communication difficulties and the occurrence of repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. There has been substantial evidence for dysregulation of the immune system in autism. Methods: We evaluated differences in the number and phenotype of circulating blood cells in young children with autism (n = 70) compared with age-matched controls (n = 35). Children with a confirmed diagnosis of autism (4-6 years of age) were further subdivided into low (IQ<68, n = 35) or high functioning (IQ≥68, n = 35) groups. Age- and gender-matched typically developing children constituted the control group. Six hundred and forty four primary and secondary variables, including cell counts and the abundance of cell surface antigens, were assessed using microvolume laser scanning cytometry. Results: There were multiple differences in immune cell populations between the autism and control groups. The absolute number of B cells per volume of blood was over 20% higher for children with autism and the absolute number of NK cells was about 40% higher. Neither of these variables showed significant difference between the low and high functioning autism groups. While the absolute number of T cells was not different across groups, a number of cellular activation markers, including HLA-DR and CD26 on T cells, and CD38 on B cells, were significantly higher in the autism group compared to controls. Conclusions: These results support previous findings that immune dysfunction may occur in some children with autism. Further evaluation of the nature of the dysfunction and how it may play a role in the etiology of autism or in facets of autism neuropathology and/or behavior are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere19299
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Autistic Disorder
Blood
Cells
T-cells
blood
Immune system
HLA-DR Antigens
Surface Antigens
Chemical activation
Scanning
B-lymphocytes
autism
B-Lymphocytes
Lasers
Laser Scanning Cytometry
T-lymphocytes
Communication
neuropathology
Stereotyped Behavior
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

In search of cellular immunophenotypes in the blood of children with autism. / Ashwood, Paul; Corbett, Blythe A.; Kantor, Aaron; Schulman, Howard; Van de Water, Judith A; Amaral, David G.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 5, e19299, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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