Improving antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes in primary care: The treatment initiation and participation (TIP) program

Jo Anne Sirey, Martha L. Bruce, Helen C. Kales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the impact of a novel psychosocial intervention to improve antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes among older adults prescribed pharmacotherapy by their primary care physician (PCP). DESIGN: A randomized controlled pilot study was conducted to examine the usefulness of the Treatment Initiation and Participation (TIP) program as an intervention to improve antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes. SETTING: The study was conducted at two primary care clinics in New York city: one clinic served geriatric adults and the second clinic served a diverse group of mixed aged adults. PARTICIPANTS: The sample consisted of adults aged 60 years and older with major depression who were recommended antidepressant therapy by their PCPs. INTERVENTION: All participants were prescribed antidepressant therapy and randomly assigned to either the intervention (TIP) or the treatment as usual (TAU) group. The TIP intervention identifies and targets psychological barriers to depression care, especially stigma, as well as fears and misconceptions of depression and its treatment. TIP participants are encouraged to develop a treatment goal and create an adherence strategy. MEASUREMENT: Study participants were assessed at entry, 6, 12, and 24 weeks later. Adherence was measured based on self-report with chart verification. Depression severity was measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. RESULTS: Participants in TIP were significantly more adherent to their antidepressant pharmacotherapy at all assessment time points and had a significantly greater decrease in depressive symptoms than older adults who received TAU. CONCLUSION: The results provide support for the usefulness of TIP as a brief intervention to improve adherence to depression medication treatment provided in primary care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)554-562
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Antidepressive Agents
Primary Health Care
Depression
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy
Primary Care Physicians
Geriatrics
Self Report
Fear
Psychology

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Depression
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Improving antidepressant adherence and depression outcomes in primary care : The treatment initiation and participation (TIP) program. / Anne Sirey, Jo; Bruce, Martha L.; Kales, Helen C.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 18, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 554-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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