Improvement of spatial and nonverbal general reasoning abilities in female veterinary medical students over the first 64 weeks of an integrated curriculum

Juan Claudio Gutierrez, Steven D. Holladay, Boaz Arzi, Christina Clarkson, Roxanne Larsen, Sakti Srivastava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Spatial visualization ability is defined as the ability to mentally rotate two- and three-dimensional figures. Visual reasoning is the ability to manipulate mental images of an object to reach a certain conclusion and has been linked to spatial ability. There is currently limited information about how entry-level spatial and visual reasoning abilities may be enhanced with progression through the rigorous veterinary medical curriculum. The present study made use of two tests that measure spatial ability and one test that measures non-verbal general reasoning ability in female veterinary students: Guay's Visualization of Views Test, Adapted Version (VVT), Mental Rotations Test (MRT), and Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices Test, short form (APMT). Tests were given immediately before commencing the integrated veterinary medical curriculum (T0), at week 32 (T1), and at week 64 (T2) into the program. Results showed improved spatial visualization ability as measured by VVT and MRT and improved non-verbal general reasoning ability as measured by APMT at both 32 and 64 weeks. The spatial ability scores measured by VVT and MRT showed a positive correlation with non-verbal general reasoning ability scores (APMT), supporting the idea that these abilities are linked.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number141
JournalFrontiers in Veterinary Science
Volume6
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Aptitude
curriculum
Medical Students
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students
Intelligence Tests
testing
Crows
Spatial Navigation
Students
veterinarians

Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Curriculum
  • Non-verbal reasoning
  • Spatial ability
  • Visuo-spatial ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Improvement of spatial and nonverbal general reasoning abilities in female veterinary medical students over the first 64 weeks of an integrated curriculum. / Gutierrez, Juan Claudio; Holladay, Steven D.; Arzi, Boaz; Clarkson, Christina; Larsen, Roxanne; Srivastava, Sakti.

In: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, Vol. 6, No. MAY, 141, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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