Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake after gastric bypass surgery is observed only after substantial weight loss has occurred and correlates with the magnitude of weight lost

Guilherme M. Campos, Charlotte Rabl, Sofia Peeva, Ruxandra Ciovica, Madhu Rao, Jean Marc Schwarz, Peter J Havel, Morris Schambelan, Kathleen Mulligan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Altered gut and pancreatic hormone secretion may bolster resolution of insulin resistance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but the independent effects of weight loss and hormonal secretion on peripheral glucose disposal are unknown. Methods: Two groups of nondiabetic morbidly obese patients were studied: RYGB followed by standardized caloric restriction (RYGB, n=12) or caloric restriction alone (diet, n=10). Metabolic evaluations (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, meal tolerance test) were done at baseline and 14 days (both groups) and 6 months after RYGB. Results: At baseline, body composition, fasting insulin, and glucose and peripheral glucose disposal did not differ between groups. At 14 days, excess weight loss (EWL) was similar (RYGB, 12.7% vs. diet, 10.9%; p=0.12), fasting insulin and glucose decreased to a similar extent, and RYGB subjects had altered postmeal patterns of gut and pancreatic hormone secretion. However, peripheral glucose uptake (M value) was unchanged in both groups. Six months after RYGB, EWL was 49.7%. The changes in fasting glucose and insulin levels and gut hormone secretion persisted. M values improved significantly, and changes in M values correlated with the % EWL (r=0.68, p=0.02). Conclusions: Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake following RYGB was observed only after substantial weight loss had occurred and correlated with the magnitude of weight lost.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-23
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Gastric Bypass
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Glucose
Pancreatic Hormones
Fasting
Caloric Restriction
Insulin
Diet
Glucose Clamp Technique
Body Composition
Meals
Insulin Resistance
Hormones

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Calorie restriction
  • Diabetes
  • Gastric bypass
  • GLP-1
  • Incretin
  • Insulin
  • Insulin resistance
  • Morbid obesity
  • Obesity
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake after gastric bypass surgery is observed only after substantial weight loss has occurred and correlates with the magnitude of weight lost. / Campos, Guilherme M.; Rabl, Charlotte; Peeva, Sofia; Ciovica, Ruxandra; Rao, Madhu; Schwarz, Jean Marc; Havel, Peter J; Schambelan, Morris; Mulligan, Kathleen.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 15-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campos, Guilherme M. ; Rabl, Charlotte ; Peeva, Sofia ; Ciovica, Ruxandra ; Rao, Madhu ; Schwarz, Jean Marc ; Havel, Peter J ; Schambelan, Morris ; Mulligan, Kathleen. / Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake after gastric bypass surgery is observed only after substantial weight loss has occurred and correlates with the magnitude of weight lost. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 15-23.
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abstract = "Introduction: Altered gut and pancreatic hormone secretion may bolster resolution of insulin resistance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but the independent effects of weight loss and hormonal secretion on peripheral glucose disposal are unknown. Methods: Two groups of nondiabetic morbidly obese patients were studied: RYGB followed by standardized caloric restriction (RYGB, n=12) or caloric restriction alone (diet, n=10). Metabolic evaluations (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, meal tolerance test) were done at baseline and 14 days (both groups) and 6 months after RYGB. Results: At baseline, body composition, fasting insulin, and glucose and peripheral glucose disposal did not differ between groups. At 14 days, excess weight loss (EWL) was similar (RYGB, 12.7{\%} vs. diet, 10.9{\%}; p=0.12), fasting insulin and glucose decreased to a similar extent, and RYGB subjects had altered postmeal patterns of gut and pancreatic hormone secretion. However, peripheral glucose uptake (M value) was unchanged in both groups. Six months after RYGB, EWL was 49.7{\%}. The changes in fasting glucose and insulin levels and gut hormone secretion persisted. M values improved significantly, and changes in M values correlated with the {\%} EWL (r=0.68, p=0.02). Conclusions: Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake following RYGB was observed only after substantial weight loss had occurred and correlated with the magnitude of weight lost.",
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AU - Campos, Guilherme M.

AU - Rabl, Charlotte

AU - Peeva, Sofia

AU - Ciovica, Ruxandra

AU - Rao, Madhu

AU - Schwarz, Jean Marc

AU - Havel, Peter J

AU - Schambelan, Morris

AU - Mulligan, Kathleen

PY - 2009/1

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N2 - Introduction: Altered gut and pancreatic hormone secretion may bolster resolution of insulin resistance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but the independent effects of weight loss and hormonal secretion on peripheral glucose disposal are unknown. Methods: Two groups of nondiabetic morbidly obese patients were studied: RYGB followed by standardized caloric restriction (RYGB, n=12) or caloric restriction alone (diet, n=10). Metabolic evaluations (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, meal tolerance test) were done at baseline and 14 days (both groups) and 6 months after RYGB. Results: At baseline, body composition, fasting insulin, and glucose and peripheral glucose disposal did not differ between groups. At 14 days, excess weight loss (EWL) was similar (RYGB, 12.7% vs. diet, 10.9%; p=0.12), fasting insulin and glucose decreased to a similar extent, and RYGB subjects had altered postmeal patterns of gut and pancreatic hormone secretion. However, peripheral glucose uptake (M value) was unchanged in both groups. Six months after RYGB, EWL was 49.7%. The changes in fasting glucose and insulin levels and gut hormone secretion persisted. M values improved significantly, and changes in M values correlated with the % EWL (r=0.68, p=0.02). Conclusions: Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake following RYGB was observed only after substantial weight loss had occurred and correlated with the magnitude of weight lost.

AB - Introduction: Altered gut and pancreatic hormone secretion may bolster resolution of insulin resistance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but the independent effects of weight loss and hormonal secretion on peripheral glucose disposal are unknown. Methods: Two groups of nondiabetic morbidly obese patients were studied: RYGB followed by standardized caloric restriction (RYGB, n=12) or caloric restriction alone (diet, n=10). Metabolic evaluations (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, meal tolerance test) were done at baseline and 14 days (both groups) and 6 months after RYGB. Results: At baseline, body composition, fasting insulin, and glucose and peripheral glucose disposal did not differ between groups. At 14 days, excess weight loss (EWL) was similar (RYGB, 12.7% vs. diet, 10.9%; p=0.12), fasting insulin and glucose decreased to a similar extent, and RYGB subjects had altered postmeal patterns of gut and pancreatic hormone secretion. However, peripheral glucose uptake (M value) was unchanged in both groups. Six months after RYGB, EWL was 49.7%. The changes in fasting glucose and insulin levels and gut hormone secretion persisted. M values improved significantly, and changes in M values correlated with the % EWL (r=0.68, p=0.02). Conclusions: Improvement in peripheral glucose uptake following RYGB was observed only after substantial weight loss had occurred and correlated with the magnitude of weight lost.

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KW - Morbid obesity

KW - Obesity

KW - Type 2 diabetes

KW - Weight loss

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