Improved growth of lipoprotein lipase deficient kittens by feeding a low-fat, highly digestible diet

Carla F. Reginato, Robert C. Backus, Quinton Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adult domestic cats homozygous with a naturally occurring Gly412Arg LPL gene mutation are good models for the study of LPL deficiency. Previous studies report that homozygous LPL deficient kittens have reduced growth rates and develop subnormal body fat mass. It was hypothesized in the present study that homozygote kittens would have normal growth if provided a standard low fat, highly digestible diet at weaning and that their body fat would be increased by provision of a diet high in protein. When fed a nutritionally complete, 10% fat, purified or commercial extruded diet, the body weights of homozygous (n = 24), heterozygous (n = 25) and normal (n = 16) kittens were determined at birth, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12 and 18 weeks of age. Male homozygote kittens from homozygote dams had reduced weight gains (p < 0.05) compared to normal males at 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Female heterozygotes and homozygotes from homozygote and heterozygote dams had reduced weight gains (p < 0.05) compared to normal females at 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks. By 6 weeks for males and 18 weeks for females, genotype related differences in weight gain were not observed. At 30 weeks, homozygotes and heterozygotes were given either a 60 or 30% (dry matter) protein diet for two months. As indicated by deuterium dilution estimation of body composition, cats eating the 30% protein diet (n = 12) tended to have a lower increase in lean body mass (p = 0.057) and a greater increase in fat mass (p = 0.092) compared to cats eating the 60% protein diet (n = 12). Increase in lean body mass among homozygotes tended to be not as great as that observed in heterozygotes (p = 0.057). Poor postweaning gains previously reported in homozygotes probably reflected inappropriate selection of diet for this genotype. The high protein diet increased the rate of lean body mass development but not body fat mass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-156
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 25 2002

Keywords

  • Body fat
  • Growth
  • Kitten
  • Lipoprotein lipase deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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