Implementation of a Flipped Classroom for Neurosurgery Resident Education

Fady Girgis, Jonathan P. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A flipped classroom model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. Methods: We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. Results: A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, p<0.05). Conclusions: The flipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-82
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Journal of Neurological Sciences
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Neurosurgery
Education
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Research

Keywords

  • Medical education research
  • Small-group teaching
  • Teaching methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Implementation of a Flipped Classroom for Neurosurgery Resident Education. / Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P.

In: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 76-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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