Impact of a student-led community education program to promote Pap test screening among Asian-American women

Kristine M. Miller, Diana F. Ha, Roshelle K. Chan, Stina W. Andersen, Lydia P Howell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Among ethnic groups, Asian-American women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer, low cervical cancer screening rates, and are more likely to state they have "never thought about" and/or "do not need" Pap testing. Through a Patient Advocacy grant awarded by the American Society of Cytopathology Foundation, we developed a culturally sensitive educational outreach program to encourage Pap screening among Asian-Americans in our community. Materials and methods: Educational materials, translated into three languages, were shared at nine community events by undergraduate and medical student volunteers. Pre- and post-education surveys on awareness, knowledge, and attitudes towards screening were administered. Results were tallied and reported as raw percentages. Results: A total of 328 surveys were completed; 80% were Asian respondents. Twenty percent of respondents were not up to date (NUTD) with Pap screening. Knowledge of Pap tests reported as "excellent"/"good" rose from 46% before to 85% after education. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to schedule a Pap test increased from 72% to 92% in the NUTD group and from 84% to 97% in the 21-29 age group. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to recommend a Pap test to others increased from 68% to 98% in the NUTD group and 77% to 97% in those aged 21-29. Conclusions: A student-led community-based culturally sensitive outreach approach improved Pap test knowledge and awareness among Asian-Americans. The largest increase in likelihood to obtain a Pap test and recommend the test to others was the NUTD and 21-29 age groups, suggesting influence on those in need of screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Society of Cytopathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 10 2017

Fingerprint

Papanicolaou Test
Asian Americans
Students
Education
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Age Groups
Patient Advocacy
Organized Financing
Medical Students
Early Detection of Cancer
Ethnic Groups
Volunteers
Appointments and Schedules
Language
Surveys and Questionnaires
Incidence

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Health disparities
  • Health education
  • Pap testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Impact of a student-led community education program to promote Pap test screening among Asian-American women. / Miller, Kristine M.; Ha, Diana F.; Chan, Roshelle K.; Andersen, Stina W.; Howell, Lydia P.

In: Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology, 10.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a8bbf02606ed4b27b236d675d72f0e1c,
title = "Impact of a student-led community education program to promote Pap test screening among Asian-American women",
abstract = "Introduction: Among ethnic groups, Asian-American women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer, low cervical cancer screening rates, and are more likely to state they have {"}never thought about{"} and/or {"}do not need{"} Pap testing. Through a Patient Advocacy grant awarded by the American Society of Cytopathology Foundation, we developed a culturally sensitive educational outreach program to encourage Pap screening among Asian-Americans in our community. Materials and methods: Educational materials, translated into three languages, were shared at nine community events by undergraduate and medical student volunteers. Pre- and post-education surveys on awareness, knowledge, and attitudes towards screening were administered. Results were tallied and reported as raw percentages. Results: A total of 328 surveys were completed; 80{\%} were Asian respondents. Twenty percent of respondents were not up to date (NUTD) with Pap screening. Knowledge of Pap tests reported as {"}excellent{"}/{"}good{"} rose from 46{\%} before to 85{\%} after education. Those reporting {"}very likely{"}/{"}likely{"} to schedule a Pap test increased from 72{\%} to 92{\%} in the NUTD group and from 84{\%} to 97{\%} in the 21-29 age group. Those reporting {"}very likely{"}/{"}likely{"} to recommend a Pap test to others increased from 68{\%} to 98{\%} in the NUTD group and 77{\%} to 97{\%} in those aged 21-29. Conclusions: A student-led community-based culturally sensitive outreach approach improved Pap test knowledge and awareness among Asian-Americans. The largest increase in likelihood to obtain a Pap test and recommend the test to others was the NUTD and 21-29 age groups, suggesting influence on those in need of screening.",
keywords = "Asian Americans, Cervical cancer screening, Health disparities, Health education, Pap testing",
author = "Miller, {Kristine M.} and Ha, {Diana F.} and Chan, {Roshelle K.} and Andersen, {Stina W.} and Howell, {Lydia P}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jasc.2017.03.004",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology",
issn = "2213-2945",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of a student-led community education program to promote Pap test screening among Asian-American women

AU - Miller, Kristine M.

AU - Ha, Diana F.

AU - Chan, Roshelle K.

AU - Andersen, Stina W.

AU - Howell, Lydia P

PY - 2017/2/10

Y1 - 2017/2/10

N2 - Introduction: Among ethnic groups, Asian-American women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer, low cervical cancer screening rates, and are more likely to state they have "never thought about" and/or "do not need" Pap testing. Through a Patient Advocacy grant awarded by the American Society of Cytopathology Foundation, we developed a culturally sensitive educational outreach program to encourage Pap screening among Asian-Americans in our community. Materials and methods: Educational materials, translated into three languages, were shared at nine community events by undergraduate and medical student volunteers. Pre- and post-education surveys on awareness, knowledge, and attitudes towards screening were administered. Results were tallied and reported as raw percentages. Results: A total of 328 surveys were completed; 80% were Asian respondents. Twenty percent of respondents were not up to date (NUTD) with Pap screening. Knowledge of Pap tests reported as "excellent"/"good" rose from 46% before to 85% after education. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to schedule a Pap test increased from 72% to 92% in the NUTD group and from 84% to 97% in the 21-29 age group. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to recommend a Pap test to others increased from 68% to 98% in the NUTD group and 77% to 97% in those aged 21-29. Conclusions: A student-led community-based culturally sensitive outreach approach improved Pap test knowledge and awareness among Asian-Americans. The largest increase in likelihood to obtain a Pap test and recommend the test to others was the NUTD and 21-29 age groups, suggesting influence on those in need of screening.

AB - Introduction: Among ethnic groups, Asian-American women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer, low cervical cancer screening rates, and are more likely to state they have "never thought about" and/or "do not need" Pap testing. Through a Patient Advocacy grant awarded by the American Society of Cytopathology Foundation, we developed a culturally sensitive educational outreach program to encourage Pap screening among Asian-Americans in our community. Materials and methods: Educational materials, translated into three languages, were shared at nine community events by undergraduate and medical student volunteers. Pre- and post-education surveys on awareness, knowledge, and attitudes towards screening were administered. Results were tallied and reported as raw percentages. Results: A total of 328 surveys were completed; 80% were Asian respondents. Twenty percent of respondents were not up to date (NUTD) with Pap screening. Knowledge of Pap tests reported as "excellent"/"good" rose from 46% before to 85% after education. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to schedule a Pap test increased from 72% to 92% in the NUTD group and from 84% to 97% in the 21-29 age group. Those reporting "very likely"/"likely" to recommend a Pap test to others increased from 68% to 98% in the NUTD group and 77% to 97% in those aged 21-29. Conclusions: A student-led community-based culturally sensitive outreach approach improved Pap test knowledge and awareness among Asian-Americans. The largest increase in likelihood to obtain a Pap test and recommend the test to others was the NUTD and 21-29 age groups, suggesting influence on those in need of screening.

KW - Asian Americans

KW - Cervical cancer screening

KW - Health disparities

KW - Health education

KW - Pap testing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018758094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018758094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jasc.2017.03.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jasc.2017.03.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 31043267

AN - SCOPUS:85018758094

JO - Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology

JF - Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology

SN - 2213-2945

ER -