Impact of a smoke-free–living educational intervention for smokers and household nonsmokers: A randomized trial of Chinese American pairs

Elisa Tong, Anne Saw, Lei Chun Fung, Chin-Shang Li, Yu Liu, Janice Y. Tsoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chinese American men smoke at a high rate, which puts household nonsmokers at risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief-intensity versus moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for household pairs. METHODS: The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial of Cantonese-speaking Chinese American smoker and household nonsmoker pairs in San Francisco, California. Pairs were randomized to moderate-intensity or brief-intensity group sessions with their household partner. The moderate-intensity group received 2 group sessions, a laboratory report of their baseline smoke exposure, as measured by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), and 3 follow-up calls over 6 months. The brief-intensity group received 1 group session on tobacco-cessation resources. Primary outcomes were biochemically validated, past-month smoking abstinence and elimination of nonsmoker household exposure at 12 months. RESULTS: Participant pairs (n = 203) were male smokers, one-half of whom did not intend to quit within 6 months, with mostly female spouses as household nonsmokers. Approximately three-quarters of nonsmokers in both groups already had smoke-free home rules. At 12 months, smokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated 30-day abstinence rates (moderate-intensity group, 0%-20.7%; brief-intensity group, 0%-20.0%; P =.002 over time). More smokers in the moderate-intensity group used subsequent cessation group classes (moderate-intensity group, 50%; brief-intensity group, 24%; P =.004). Household nonsmokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated rates of no home exposure (moderate-intensity group, 24.5%-42.2%; brief-intensity group, 24.8%-33.3%; P =.0001 over time). CONCLUSIONS: A moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for Chinese-speaking household pairs was not more effective than a brief-intensity intervention for smoking abstinence and elimination of household nonsmoker exposure. Abstinence rates were similar to those achieved with standard group counseling. Cancer 2018;124:1590-8.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1590-1598
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume124
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Asian Americans
Smoke
Smoking
Tobacco Use Cessation
San Francisco
Spouses
Counseling
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) biomarker
  • Chinese
  • secondhand smoke
  • smoke-free home
  • tobacco cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Impact of a smoke-free–living educational intervention for smokers and household nonsmokers : A randomized trial of Chinese American pairs. / Tong, Elisa; Saw, Anne; Fung, Lei Chun; Li, Chin-Shang; Liu, Yu; Tsoh, Janice Y.

In: Cancer, Vol. 124, 01.04.2018, p. 1590-1598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Impact of a smoke-free–living educational intervention for smokers and household nonsmokers: A randomized trial of Chinese American pairs",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Chinese American men smoke at a high rate, which puts household nonsmokers at risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief-intensity versus moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for household pairs. METHODS: The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial of Cantonese-speaking Chinese American smoker and household nonsmoker pairs in San Francisco, California. Pairs were randomized to moderate-intensity or brief-intensity group sessions with their household partner. The moderate-intensity group received 2 group sessions, a laboratory report of their baseline smoke exposure, as measured by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), and 3 follow-up calls over 6 months. The brief-intensity group received 1 group session on tobacco-cessation resources. Primary outcomes were biochemically validated, past-month smoking abstinence and elimination of nonsmoker household exposure at 12 months. RESULTS: Participant pairs (n = 203) were male smokers, one-half of whom did not intend to quit within 6 months, with mostly female spouses as household nonsmokers. Approximately three-quarters of nonsmokers in both groups already had smoke-free home rules. At 12 months, smokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated 30-day abstinence rates (moderate-intensity group, 0{\%}-20.7{\%}; brief-intensity group, 0{\%}-20.0{\%}; P =.002 over time). More smokers in the moderate-intensity group used subsequent cessation group classes (moderate-intensity group, 50{\%}; brief-intensity group, 24{\%}; P =.004). Household nonsmokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated rates of no home exposure (moderate-intensity group, 24.5{\%}-42.2{\%}; brief-intensity group, 24.8{\%}-33.3{\%}; P =.0001 over time). CONCLUSIONS: A moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for Chinese-speaking household pairs was not more effective than a brief-intensity intervention for smoking abstinence and elimination of household nonsmoker exposure. Abstinence rates were similar to those achieved with standard group counseling. Cancer 2018;124:1590-8.",
keywords = "4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) biomarker, Chinese, secondhand smoke, smoke-free home, tobacco cessation",
author = "Elisa Tong and Anne Saw and Fung, {Lei Chun} and Chin-Shang Li and Yu Liu and Tsoh, {Janice Y.}",
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T2 - A randomized trial of Chinese American pairs

AU - Tong, Elisa

AU - Saw, Anne

AU - Fung, Lei Chun

AU - Li, Chin-Shang

AU - Liu, Yu

AU - Tsoh, Janice Y.

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Chinese American men smoke at a high rate, which puts household nonsmokers at risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief-intensity versus moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for household pairs. METHODS: The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial of Cantonese-speaking Chinese American smoker and household nonsmoker pairs in San Francisco, California. Pairs were randomized to moderate-intensity or brief-intensity group sessions with their household partner. The moderate-intensity group received 2 group sessions, a laboratory report of their baseline smoke exposure, as measured by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), and 3 follow-up calls over 6 months. The brief-intensity group received 1 group session on tobacco-cessation resources. Primary outcomes were biochemically validated, past-month smoking abstinence and elimination of nonsmoker household exposure at 12 months. RESULTS: Participant pairs (n = 203) were male smokers, one-half of whom did not intend to quit within 6 months, with mostly female spouses as household nonsmokers. Approximately three-quarters of nonsmokers in both groups already had smoke-free home rules. At 12 months, smokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated 30-day abstinence rates (moderate-intensity group, 0%-20.7%; brief-intensity group, 0%-20.0%; P =.002 over time). More smokers in the moderate-intensity group used subsequent cessation group classes (moderate-intensity group, 50%; brief-intensity group, 24%; P =.004). Household nonsmokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated rates of no home exposure (moderate-intensity group, 24.5%-42.2%; brief-intensity group, 24.8%-33.3%; P =.0001 over time). CONCLUSIONS: A moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for Chinese-speaking household pairs was not more effective than a brief-intensity intervention for smoking abstinence and elimination of household nonsmoker exposure. Abstinence rates were similar to those achieved with standard group counseling. Cancer 2018;124:1590-8.

AB - BACKGROUND: Chinese American men smoke at a high rate, which puts household nonsmokers at risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief-intensity versus moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for household pairs. METHODS: The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial of Cantonese-speaking Chinese American smoker and household nonsmoker pairs in San Francisco, California. Pairs were randomized to moderate-intensity or brief-intensity group sessions with their household partner. The moderate-intensity group received 2 group sessions, a laboratory report of their baseline smoke exposure, as measured by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), and 3 follow-up calls over 6 months. The brief-intensity group received 1 group session on tobacco-cessation resources. Primary outcomes were biochemically validated, past-month smoking abstinence and elimination of nonsmoker household exposure at 12 months. RESULTS: Participant pairs (n = 203) were male smokers, one-half of whom did not intend to quit within 6 months, with mostly female spouses as household nonsmokers. Approximately three-quarters of nonsmokers in both groups already had smoke-free home rules. At 12 months, smokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated 30-day abstinence rates (moderate-intensity group, 0%-20.7%; brief-intensity group, 0%-20.0%; P =.002 over time). More smokers in the moderate-intensity group used subsequent cessation group classes (moderate-intensity group, 50%; brief-intensity group, 24%; P =.004). Household nonsmokers in both groups had similar biochemically validated rates of no home exposure (moderate-intensity group, 24.5%-42.2%; brief-intensity group, 24.8%-33.3%; P =.0001 over time). CONCLUSIONS: A moderate-intensity smoke-free–living educational intervention for Chinese-speaking household pairs was not more effective than a brief-intensity intervention for smoking abstinence and elimination of household nonsmoker exposure. Abstinence rates were similar to those achieved with standard group counseling. Cancer 2018;124:1590-8.

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KW - secondhand smoke

KW - smoke-free home

KW - tobacco cessation

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