Immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA) and complement (C3) concentrations in uterine secretion following an intrauterine challenge of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mares susceptible to versus resistant to chronic uterine infection

M. H.T. Troedsson, Irwin Liu, Mark Thurmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The validity of measuring concentrations of immunoglobulins in undiluted uterine secretions was established. The concentrations of IgG, IgA, and cleavage factor C3 of the complement system in uterine secretions were compared in mares with different resistance to chronic uterine infection (CUI). The uteri of mares susceptible (n = 6) and resistant to CUI (n = 5) were inoculated with 5 x 106 Streptococcus zooepidemicus when the mares were in estrus. Uterine secretions were sampled, and sampling was immediately followed by a uterine lavage at 5 and 24 h after bacterial inoculation. During a subsequent estrus, bacterial inoculation of the uterus was repeated, and samples were taken from the mares 12 and 36 h later. The fraction of uterine secretion in each uterine washing was determined by dividing the protein concentration of the undiluted uterine secretion by the protein concentration of the corresponding uterine washing. There was a significant correlation between measured concentrations of immunoglobulins in uterine secretions and calculated concentrations in the uterine washings (p < 0.05). Concentrations of IgG and C3 in uterine secretions declined similarly in both susceptible and resistant mares during the first 24 h after bacterial inoculation (p < 0.04). In contrast to the susceptible group, which showed a continuous decline at 36 h, resistant mares demonstrated an increased concentration of both IgG and C3 at this time. Concentrations of IgA did not differ between susceptible and resistant mares. It was concluded that the described method of sampling uterine secretions was useful for analyzing IgG and IgA. Since this study was unable to detect differences in IgA, IgG, and C3 concentrations during the first 24 h of infection, the impaired uterine defense in mares susceptible to CUI is not likely to be due to local immunoglobulin deficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)502-506
Number of pages5
JournalBiology of Reproduction
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Streptococcus equi
Complement C3
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulins
Immunoglobulin G
Infection
Estrus
Uterus
Therapeutic Irrigation
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

@article{2aff51d724ae4fb18521232d71538a38,
title = "Immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA) and complement (C3) concentrations in uterine secretion following an intrauterine challenge of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mares susceptible to versus resistant to chronic uterine infection",
abstract = "The validity of measuring concentrations of immunoglobulins in undiluted uterine secretions was established. The concentrations of IgG, IgA, and cleavage factor C3 of the complement system in uterine secretions were compared in mares with different resistance to chronic uterine infection (CUI). The uteri of mares susceptible (n = 6) and resistant to CUI (n = 5) were inoculated with 5 x 106 Streptococcus zooepidemicus when the mares were in estrus. Uterine secretions were sampled, and sampling was immediately followed by a uterine lavage at 5 and 24 h after bacterial inoculation. During a subsequent estrus, bacterial inoculation of the uterus was repeated, and samples were taken from the mares 12 and 36 h later. The fraction of uterine secretion in each uterine washing was determined by dividing the protein concentration of the undiluted uterine secretion by the protein concentration of the corresponding uterine washing. There was a significant correlation between measured concentrations of immunoglobulins in uterine secretions and calculated concentrations in the uterine washings (p < 0.05). Concentrations of IgG and C3 in uterine secretions declined similarly in both susceptible and resistant mares during the first 24 h after bacterial inoculation (p < 0.04). In contrast to the susceptible group, which showed a continuous decline at 36 h, resistant mares demonstrated an increased concentration of both IgG and C3 at this time. Concentrations of IgA did not differ between susceptible and resistant mares. It was concluded that the described method of sampling uterine secretions was useful for analyzing IgG and IgA. Since this study was unable to detect differences in IgA, IgG, and C3 concentrations during the first 24 h of infection, the impaired uterine defense in mares susceptible to CUI is not likely to be due to local immunoglobulin deficiency.",
author = "Troedsson, {M. H.T.} and Irwin Liu and Mark Thurmond",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1095/biolreprod49.3.502",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "502--506",
journal = "Biology of Reproduction",
issn = "0006-3363",
publisher = "Society for the Study of Reproduction",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA) and complement (C3) concentrations in uterine secretion following an intrauterine challenge of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mares susceptible to versus resistant to chronic uterine infection

AU - Troedsson, M. H.T.

AU - Liu, Irwin

AU - Thurmond, Mark

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - The validity of measuring concentrations of immunoglobulins in undiluted uterine secretions was established. The concentrations of IgG, IgA, and cleavage factor C3 of the complement system in uterine secretions were compared in mares with different resistance to chronic uterine infection (CUI). The uteri of mares susceptible (n = 6) and resistant to CUI (n = 5) were inoculated with 5 x 106 Streptococcus zooepidemicus when the mares were in estrus. Uterine secretions were sampled, and sampling was immediately followed by a uterine lavage at 5 and 24 h after bacterial inoculation. During a subsequent estrus, bacterial inoculation of the uterus was repeated, and samples were taken from the mares 12 and 36 h later. The fraction of uterine secretion in each uterine washing was determined by dividing the protein concentration of the undiluted uterine secretion by the protein concentration of the corresponding uterine washing. There was a significant correlation between measured concentrations of immunoglobulins in uterine secretions and calculated concentrations in the uterine washings (p < 0.05). Concentrations of IgG and C3 in uterine secretions declined similarly in both susceptible and resistant mares during the first 24 h after bacterial inoculation (p < 0.04). In contrast to the susceptible group, which showed a continuous decline at 36 h, resistant mares demonstrated an increased concentration of both IgG and C3 at this time. Concentrations of IgA did not differ between susceptible and resistant mares. It was concluded that the described method of sampling uterine secretions was useful for analyzing IgG and IgA. Since this study was unable to detect differences in IgA, IgG, and C3 concentrations during the first 24 h of infection, the impaired uterine defense in mares susceptible to CUI is not likely to be due to local immunoglobulin deficiency.

AB - The validity of measuring concentrations of immunoglobulins in undiluted uterine secretions was established. The concentrations of IgG, IgA, and cleavage factor C3 of the complement system in uterine secretions were compared in mares with different resistance to chronic uterine infection (CUI). The uteri of mares susceptible (n = 6) and resistant to CUI (n = 5) were inoculated with 5 x 106 Streptococcus zooepidemicus when the mares were in estrus. Uterine secretions were sampled, and sampling was immediately followed by a uterine lavage at 5 and 24 h after bacterial inoculation. During a subsequent estrus, bacterial inoculation of the uterus was repeated, and samples were taken from the mares 12 and 36 h later. The fraction of uterine secretion in each uterine washing was determined by dividing the protein concentration of the undiluted uterine secretion by the protein concentration of the corresponding uterine washing. There was a significant correlation between measured concentrations of immunoglobulins in uterine secretions and calculated concentrations in the uterine washings (p < 0.05). Concentrations of IgG and C3 in uterine secretions declined similarly in both susceptible and resistant mares during the first 24 h after bacterial inoculation (p < 0.04). In contrast to the susceptible group, which showed a continuous decline at 36 h, resistant mares demonstrated an increased concentration of both IgG and C3 at this time. Concentrations of IgA did not differ between susceptible and resistant mares. It was concluded that the described method of sampling uterine secretions was useful for analyzing IgG and IgA. Since this study was unable to detect differences in IgA, IgG, and C3 concentrations during the first 24 h of infection, the impaired uterine defense in mares susceptible to CUI is not likely to be due to local immunoglobulin deficiency.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027250303&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027250303&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1095/biolreprod49.3.502

DO - 10.1095/biolreprod49.3.502

M3 - Article

C2 - 8399842

AN - SCOPUS:0027250303

VL - 49

SP - 502

EP - 506

JO - Biology of Reproduction

JF - Biology of Reproduction

SN - 0006-3363

IS - 3

ER -