Immune activation and oxidative damage in HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescents

Charles B. Stephensen, Grace S. Marquis, Steven D. Douglas, Craig M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a cross-sectional study involving subjects from the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Health cohort, we examined the associations between HIV status, disease severity, immune activation, and oxidative damage. Subjects (265 HIV-positive and 127 HIV-negative) were young (range: 14-23 years of age) and primarily female (75%) and black (67%). Many subjects, particularly female subjects, were overweight or obese. Relatively few HIV-positive subjects had advanced HIV disease (13%), and 54% were taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). The 2 markers of oxidative damage used in this study (plasma malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl concentrations) did not correlate with each other, and neither was higher in HIV-positive subjects than in HIV-negative controls. Increased oxidative damage was seen in association with male gender, cigarette smoking, marijuana use, immune activation (as indicated by activated CD8+ T-cell counts and plasma C-reactive protein concentration), and use of ART, however. Plasma ceruloplasmin was associated with decreased oxidative damage in HIV-positive subjects, although this association was not seen in those taking ART.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-190
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

Fingerprint

HIV
Blood Proteins
Ceruloplasmin
Immune System Diseases
Cannabis
Malondialdehyde
C-Reactive Protein
Therapeutics
Cell Count
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
T-Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Acute-phase response
  • Adolescent
  • Black
  • C-reactive protein
  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Female
  • Hispanic
  • HIV
  • Malondialdehyde
  • Neopterin
  • Obesity
  • Oxidative stress
  • Protein carbonyl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Immune activation and oxidative damage in HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescents. / Stephensen, Charles B.; Marquis, Grace S.; Douglas, Steven D.; Wilson, Craig M.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 180-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stephensen, Charles B. ; Marquis, Grace S. ; Douglas, Steven D. ; Wilson, Craig M. / Immune activation and oxidative damage in HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescents. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2005 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 180-190.
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