Immediate zidovudine treatment protects simian immunodeficiency virus- infected newborn macaques against rapid onset of AIDS

K. K A Van Rompay, M. G. Otsyula, Marta Marthas, Chris J Miller, M. B. McChesney, Niels C Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of newborn rhesus macaques is a practical animal model of pediatric AIDS. Intravenous inoculation of rhesus newborns with uncloned SIV(mac) resulted in a high virus load, no antiviral immune responses, severe immunodeficiency, and a high mortality rate within 3 months. In contrast, immediate oral zidovudine (AZT) treatment of SIV-inoculated rhesus newborns either prevented infection or resulted in reduced virus load, enhanced antiviral immune responses, a low frequency of AZT-resistant virus isolates, and delayed disease progression with negligible toxicity. These results suggest that early chronic AZT treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-exposed newborns may have benefits that outweigh its potential side effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume39
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Immediate zidovudine treatment protects simian immunodeficiency virus- infected newborn macaques against rapid onset of AIDS'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this