Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis

Diego A. Herrera, Arthur B. Dublin, Eleanor L. Ormsby, Shervin Aminpour, Lydia P Howell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe common radiographic patterns that may be useful in predicting the diagnosis of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the imaging and clinical data of four males and one female, 3 to 72 years old, with rhlnocerebral mucormycosis. Results: All the patients presented with sinusitis and ophthalmological symptoms. Most of the patients (80%) had isointense lesions relative to brain in T1-weighted images. The signal intensity in T2-weighted images was more variable, with only one (20%) patient showing hyperintensity. A pattern of anatomic involvement affecting the nasal cavity, maxillary sinus, orbit, and ethmoid cells was consistently observed in all five patients (100%). Our series demonstrated a mortality rate of 60%. Conclusion: Progressive and rapid involvement of the cavernous sinus, vascular structures and intracranial contents is the usual evolution of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. In the context of immunosupression, a pattern of nasal cavity, maxillary sinus, ethmoid cells, and orbit inflammatory lesions should prompt the diagnosis of mucormycosis. Multiplanar magnetic resonance imaging shows anatomic involvement, helping in surgery planning. However, the prognosis is grave despite radical surgery and antifungals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-126
Number of pages10
JournalSkull Base
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Mucormycosis
Maxillary Sinus
Nasal Cavity
Orbit
Cavernous Sinus
Sinusitis
Blood Vessels
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mortality
Brain

Keywords

  • Imaging findings
  • MRI
  • Neuroradiology
  • Rhinocerebral mucormycosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Herrera, D. A., Dublin, A. B., Ormsby, E. L., Aminpour, S., & Howell, L. P. (2009). Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Skull Base, 19(2), 117-126. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1096209

Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. / Herrera, Diego A.; Dublin, Arthur B.; Ormsby, Eleanor L.; Aminpour, Shervin; Howell, Lydia P.

In: Skull Base, Vol. 19, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 117-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herrera, DA, Dublin, AB, Ormsby, EL, Aminpour, S & Howell, LP 2009, 'Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis', Skull Base, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 117-126. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1096209
Herrera DA, Dublin AB, Ormsby EL, Aminpour S, Howell LP. Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Skull Base. 2009 Mar;19(2):117-126. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1096209
Herrera, Diego A. ; Dublin, Arthur B. ; Ormsby, Eleanor L. ; Aminpour, Shervin ; Howell, Lydia P. / Imaging findings of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. In: Skull Base. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 117-126.
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