IL-35 and Autoimmunity: a Comprehensive Perspective

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Abstract

Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is the most recently identified member of the IL-12 family of cytokines and offers the potential to be a target for new therapies for autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Similar to other members of the IL-12 family including IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27, IL-35 is composed of a heterodimer of α and β chains, which in the case of IL-35 are the p35 and Epstein–Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) proteins. However, unlike its proinflammatory relatives, IL-35 has immunosuppressive effects that are mediated through regulatory T and B cells. Although there are limited data available regarding the role of IL-35 in human autoimmunity, several murine models of autoimmunity suggest that IL-35 may have potent effects in regulating immunoreactivity via IL-10-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that similar effects are operational in human disease and IL-35-directed therapies hold significant promise. In particular, we emphasize that IL-35 has immunosuppressive ability that are mediated via regulatory T and B cells that are IL-10 dependent. Further, although deletion of IL-35 does not result in spontaneous breach of tolerance, recombinant IL-35 can improve autoimmune responses in several experimental models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-332
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • IL-12
  • Immunosuppressants
  • Regulatory T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

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