IGF-II and IGF binding protein (IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3) gene expression in fetal rhesus monkey tissues during the second and third trimesters

Charles C Lee, Orly Goldstein, Victor K M Han, Alice F Tarantal

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Abstract

The IGF system is a key modulator of somatic fetal growth. Studies with human fetal tissues have shown a specific spatial and temporal pattern of expression of IGF and IGF binding protein (IGFBP) mRNAs, but have been limited to defined periods during gestation (i.e. 8-20 wk gestation) because of tissue availability. To fully assess the role of these peptides in the primate growth process, a longitudinal study was conducted that focused on the expression of IGF-II and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 genes in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Liver, kidney, brain, and lung were collected from rhesus monkey fetuses approximately every 2 wk from 65 (early second trimester) through 150 d gestation (term 165 ± 10 d) (n = 50), then processed for in situ hybridization using radiolabeled human cDNAs. IGF-II mRNA was abundantly expressed in fetal kidney (maturing glomerulus, supporting mesenchyme, cells of the developing nephrons), liver (hepatocytes), cerebral cortex (choroid plexus, capillaries), and lung (blood vessels, connective tissues, lamina propria, cartilage framework), IGFBP-1 was expressed only in the hepatocytes and IGFBP-3 mRNA was modestly expressed within the kidney (developing nephrons, collecting system mesenchyme), and liver (hepatocytes). These studies have shown that (1) IGF-III, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 are expressed in specific cell types of the fetal monkey indicating a paracrine/autocrine role during development; (2) changes in IGF-II and IGFBP mRNA expression occur with advancing gestation: and (3) fetal monkey tissues express IGF-II and IGFBPs in a similar manner when compared with the human fetus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-387
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Research
Volume49
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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