Idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs

37 Cases (1997-2002)

Rebecca C. Windsor, Lynelle R Johnson, Eric J. Herrgesell, Hilde E V De Cock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To determine clinical signs and rhinoscopic, computed tomographic, and histologic abnormalities in dogs with idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-37 dogs. Procedure-Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Nasal computed tomographic images and histologic slides of biopsy specimens were reviewed. Results-Dogs ranged from 1.5 to 14 years old (mean, 8 years); most (28) were large-breed dogs. Nasal discharge was unilateral in 11 of 26 (42%) dogs and bilateral in 15 of 26 (58%) dogs. In dogs with unilateral disease, duration of clinical signs ranged from 1.5 to 36 months (mean, 8.25 months; median, 2 months), and in dogs with bilateral disease, duration of signs ranged from 1.25 to 30 months (mean, 6.5 months; median, 4 months). Computed tomography (n = 33) most often revealed fluid accumulation (27/33 [82%]), turbinate destruction (23/33 [70%]), and frontal sinus opacification (14/33 [42%]). Rhinoscopy (n = 37) commonly demonstrated increased mucus and epithelial inflammation; turbinate destruction was detected in 8 of 37 (22%) dogs. Bilateral biopsy specimens from all 37 dogs were examined. Four dogs had only unilateral inflammatory changes. The remaining 33 dogs had bilateral lesions; in 20, lesions were more severe on 1 side than the other. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Findings suggest that idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis is a key contributor to chronic nasal disease in dogs and may be more common than previously believed. In addition, findings suggest that idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis is most often a bilateral disease, even among dogs with unilateral nasal discharge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1952-1957
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume224
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2004

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rhinitis
Rhinitis
Dogs
dogs
Nose
Turbinates
lesions (animal)
biopsy
rhinoscopy
Nose Diseases
duration
dog diseases
Biopsy
Frontal Sinus
dog breeds
sinuses
computed tomography
mucus
Mucus
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs : 37 Cases (1997-2002). / Windsor, Rebecca C.; Johnson, Lynelle R; Herrgesell, Eric J.; De Cock, Hilde E V.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 224, No. 12, 15.06.2004, p. 1952-1957.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Windsor, Rebecca C. ; Johnson, Lynelle R ; Herrgesell, Eric J. ; De Cock, Hilde E V. / Idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs : 37 Cases (1997-2002). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2004 ; Vol. 224, No. 12. pp. 1952-1957.
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