Identification and management of tuberculosis

Anthony F Jerant, Michelle Bannon, Stephen Rittenhouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the resurgence of tuberculosis in the early 1990s has largely been controlled, the risk of contracting this disease remains high in homeless persons, recent immigrants and persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Purified protein derivative testing should be targeted at these groups and at persons with known or suspected exposure to active tuberculosis. Most patients with latent tuberculosis are treated with isoniazid administered daily for nine months. In patients with active tuberculosis, the initial regimen should include four drugs for at least two months, with subsequent therapy determined by mycobacterial sensitivities and clinical response. To avoid harmful drug interactions, regimens that do not contain rifampin may be employed in HIV-infected patients who are taking protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To maximize compliance and minimize the emergence of mycobacterial drug resistance, family physicians should consider using directly observed therapy in all patients with tuberculosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2667-2678
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume61
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 2000

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Tuberculosis
Directly Observed Therapy
HIV
Latent Tuberculosis
Homeless Persons
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Isoniazid
Family Physicians
Rifampin
Protease Inhibitors
Drug Interactions
Drug Resistance
Compliance
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jerant, A. F., Bannon, M., & Rittenhouse, S. (2000). Identification and management of tuberculosis. American Family Physician, 61(9), 2667-2678.

Identification and management of tuberculosis. / Jerant, Anthony F; Bannon, Michelle; Rittenhouse, Stephen.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 61, No. 9, 01.05.2000, p. 2667-2678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jerant, AF, Bannon, M & Rittenhouse, S 2000, 'Identification and management of tuberculosis', American Family Physician, vol. 61, no. 9, pp. 2667-2678.
Jerant AF, Bannon M, Rittenhouse S. Identification and management of tuberculosis. American Family Physician. 2000 May 1;61(9):2667-2678.
Jerant, Anthony F ; Bannon, Michelle ; Rittenhouse, Stephen. / Identification and management of tuberculosis. In: American Family Physician. 2000 ; Vol. 61, No. 9. pp. 2667-2678.
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