Hypersensitivity to cell killing and mutation induction by chemical carcinogens in an excision repair-deficient mutant of CHO cells

L. H. Thompson, E. P. Salazar, K. W. Brookman, C. A. Hoy

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37 Scopus citations

Abstract

A strain of Chinese hamster ovary cells that is deficient in nucleotide excision repair, strain UV5, was compared with the normal parental CHO cells in terms of cytotoxicity and mutagenesis after exposure to several chemical carcinogens that are known to produce bulky, covalent adducts in DNA. Induced mutations were measured at the hprt locus using thioguanine resistance and at the aprt locus using azaadenine resistance. The compounds tested that required metabolic activation (using rat or hamster microsomal fractions) were 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene, aflatoxin B1, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and 2-naphthylamine. The direct-acting compounds (±)-r-7,t-8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyreneN-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, and N-OH-2-naphthylamine were also studied. For all compounds except 2-naphthylamine and its active metabolite, the repair-deficient cells were significantly more sensitive to killing than the normal CHO cells. Mutation induction at both loci was also more efficient in UV5 cells in each instance where enhanced cytotoxicity was observed. By using tritium-labeled N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, normal and mutant cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-344
Number of pages16
JournalMutation Research DNA Repair Reports
Volume112
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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